Jump to main content

Search Results

« Back to all neighborhoods
  1. Lower Waverly Valley Park/Martin Luther King Jr. Park Santee and Greene Streets
  2. Lower Waverly 2200 & 2300 Blocks of Greene Street 2200 & 2300 Blocks of Greene Street
  3. Lower Waverly Site of Reverend Isaiah DeQuincy Newman Home 2227 College Street
  4. Lower Waverly 923 Pine Street 923 Pine Street
  5. Lower Waverly Site of Julius Franklin Bowman Home 927 Pine Street
  6. Lower Waverly Mrs. S.H. Smith Tourist Home 929 Pine Street
  7. Lower Waverly 928 Pine Street 928 Pine Street
  8. Lower Waverly 1001 Oak Street 1001 Oak Street
  9. Lower Waverly 2226 Senate Street 2226 Senate Street
  10. Lower Waverly Chappelle Memorial A.M.E. Church 1101 Pine Street
  11. Lower Waverly Holman's Barber Shop 2128 Gervais Street
  12. Lower Waverly Palmetto Seafood 2200 Gervais Street
  13. Lower Waverly Waverly Methodist Church/Wheatley Branch Library 2314 Gervais Street
  14. Lower Waverly M.W. Prince Hall Grand Lodge 2324 Gervais Street
  15. Lower Waverly Site of Waverly Elementary School Gervais & Millwood Streets
  16. Lower Waverly Site of Celia Dial Saxon Home 1127 Page Street
  17. Lower Waverly Urban Renewal 1100 Block of House Street
  18. Lower Waverly Site of J.P. Holley Funeral Home 2469 Senate Street
  19. Lower Waverly Home of George Elmore 907 Tree Street
  20. Lower Waverly Bouler Home 2489 Bratton Street
  21. Lower Waverly Effects of Segregated Communities/Community Development
  22. Lower Waverly Neighborhood Public Art and Beautification Efforts
  23. Lower Waverly Zeta Phi Beta Sorority House 1010 Pine Street
  24. Lower Waverly 1004 Short Street 1004 Short Street
  25. Lower Waverly 2400 Block Bratton Street 2400 Block Bratton Street
  26. Lower Waverly 2595 Cherry Street 2595 Cherry Street
  27. Lower Waverly 2338 Gervais Street 2338 Gervais Street
  28. Lower Waverly 2354 Gervais Street 2354 Gervais Street
  29. Lower Waverly Pendleton, Short & Millwood Streets Pendleton, Short & Millwood Streets
  30. Lower Waverly Millwood Area Residents
  31. Lower Waverly 2104 Pendleton Street 2104 Pendleton Street
  32. Lower Waverly 2108 Pendleton Street 2108 Pendleton Street
  33. Lower Waverly 2211 Pendleton Street 2211 Pendleton Street

1

Lower Waverly

Valley Park/Martin Luther King Jr. Park

Detail from Map of Columbia, SC and Suburbs, 1895, by Niernsee & LaMotte
Image courtesy South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Central to today's Lower Waverly and Old Shandon neighborhoods that surround it, Martin Luther King, Jr. Park, under different names, has been a community landmark since the founding of Shandon, Columbia's first planned suburb, in 1893. Initially known as Shandon Pavilion, this public green space was intended as a resort with a casino, bathhouses, and sporting opportunities for seasonal tourists. Accessible by trolley, Valley Park, as it was renamed by 1895, became a favorite recreational area for whites only until integration in the 1950s. In 1993, the park was assigned its current name in honor of the nation's most celebrated civil rights leader.

Originally a whites-only recreational area, Valley Park, like other city green spaces, became available to all citizens following integration. The park's early building, shown here in a photograph by City of Columbia housing inspector Joseph Winter in August of 1966 during a public health inoculation clinic, was eventually demolished. In its place came the more modern facility standing within the park today.

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Today, Valley Park and its modern community center carry the name of the United States' most celebrated civil rights leader – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Recently, the center was adorned with a large portrait that adds another chapter in the community's history of public art and improvements.

Warner Montgomery describes playing in Valley Park

Delores Frazier recalls her efforts to desegregate Valley Park

Durham Carter shares the reality of segregated space

Lower Waverly

Valley Park/Martin Luther King Jr. Park

Close

2

Lower Waverly

2200 & 2300 Blocks of Greene Street

Along the northern boundary of Valley Park, white citizens built stylish bungalows and American Foursquare residences during the 1920s and 1930s. Decades later, many of these properties became the homes of African-American families that in the era of Jim Crow could not initially benefit from the city-owned amenities located across the street. During the later 20th century, many of these houses became popular rental properties for University of South Carolina students seeking affordable accommodations conveniently located near Five Points.

Al Hester describes living on Stark Street

Lower Waverly

2200 & 2300 Blocks of Greene Street

Close

3

Lower Waverly

Site of Reverend Isaiah DeQuincy Newman Home

Image courtesy South Carolina Political Collections, University of South Carolina Libraries

Darlington native Isaiah DeQuincey Newman (1911- 1985) was a life-long humanitarian and South Carolina's first African-American state senator since 1887. Considered one of the state's most important civil rights leaders, Newman was known to prefer negotiation to confrontation. For over forty years, he served in the United Methodist Church and became close to prominent state politicians including governors McNair, Riley, and West, Senator Hollings, and Congressman Dorn, who often sought his counsel on divisive racial issues. While living at this site from 1960 to 1961, Newman served as pastor for Wesley Methodist Church and as the Field Secretary of the NAACP.

Lower Waverly

Site of Reverend Isaiah DeQuincy Newman Home

Close

4

Lower Waverly

923 Pine Street

Nestled among Lower Waverly's early 20th-century cottages and bungalows stands a handful of two-story houses built during the 1910s and 1930s. Reflecting styles found in other early Columbia suburbs, these residences proved popular with both black and white professionals seeking contemporary houses not far from the city's downtown. According to city directories from 1910 through 1950, plasterer Marshall LaBorde, boardinghouse owner Maggie Ellington, and housepainter Robert Griffin and his wife Mamie, all black citizens, once called this property home.

Lower Waverly

923 Pine Street

Close

5

Lower Waverly

Site of Julius Franklin Bowman Home

Directly descended from a free-black family that settled Calla and Selwood (present-day Irmo), Julius Franklin Bowman founded the first African-American drayage, or freight moving, business in Columbia in 1912. With his carpentry skills, Bowman built a two-story house that once stood on this site. Here, he and his wife raised four children – a son, who later assumed the family business, and three daughters, all of whom graduated from college. Chappelle A.M.E. found its way into the community through a Sunday school class hosted by Bowman. Later, he helped build Chappelle Station A.M.E. Church on the corner of Pine and Senate streets. Bowman also served on its Board of Trustees of the Columbia Conference as secretary-treasurer until his death in 1934.

Each of Bowman's daughters received a college education. Ermanese and Laura went to Allen University, while their sister Mattie went to South Carolina State.

 

Images courtesy Marianna Davis

Lower Waverly

Site of Julius Franklin Bowman Home

Close

6

Lower Waverly

Mrs. S.H. Smith Tourist Home

Image courtesy Delores Frazier

With money from the sale of their father's plantation land, where part of Lake Murray now rests, sisters Simmie Hiller Smith, a mulatto dressmaker, and Bernice Hiller Fambro had this residence built by 1919, based on its presence in the Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of that year. Listed in The Negro Travelers Green Book for 1956 as the "Mrs. S.H. Smith Tourist Home," this property was among a handful of private homes made available to traveling African Americans barred from white-owned motels during the era of Jim Crow. Notable visitors who lodged here included Cab Calloway, Father Divine, and Duke Ellington.

The lens of celebrated African-American photographer Richard Samuel Roberts captured the members of the Smith family in this photograph taken during the 1920s. From top left to bottom right are Simmie Hiller Smith, John Henry Hiller, Bernice Hiller Fambro, Samuel Hiller, Alice Kessler Hiller, and Benjamin Hiller.

Image courtesy Delores Frazier

Delores Frazier recounts her grandmother's tourist house

Lower Waverly

Mrs. S.H. Smith Tourist Home

Close

7

Lower Waverly

928 Pine Street

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of 1956
Map excerpt courtesy South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

According to city directories, this corner residence was built by 1903 and featured a dependency. A smaller support building once common to many houses in earlier centuries, dependencies typically functioned as kitchen houses built separately from the main house due to the threat of fire. With the introduction of electricity, dependencies were often put to other uses, such as offices and supplemental housing. As the property’s first owner was Chamal H. Stokes, a white carpenter with Southern Railway, this property’s dependency, which once stood farther away from the main house, might have served as a workshop.

The Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of 1919 illustrates the original configuration of 928 Pine Street (listed as 930 Pine Street) in relation to other structures. To its east lies 2204 Pendleton Street, which according to the 1915 City Directory, was a store run by grocers Motley & Eller, with Eller and his wife Mary residing in the house. Five years later B.M. Motley and his wife Maggie are listed as the house’s occupants. It appears that by that time the grocer partnership had dissolved, the Motleys had assumed residence of the property.

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of 1919
Map excerpt courtesy South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Lower Waverly

928 Pine Street

Close

8

Lower Waverly

1001 Oak Street

Along some of the western-most streets within Lower Waverly stand remarkably intact historic houses. The oldest of these properties include late 19th- and early 20th-century cottages, some of which retain their original pressed-tin roofs, such as this circa-1903 house that features a modest symmetrical façade with ornate porch posts indicative of Victorian design. Initially home to white salespersons, railroad employees, and African-American domestic workers, this historic residence is now a rental property.

Lower Waverly

1001 Oak Street

Close

9

Lower Waverly

2226 Senate Street

With the introduction of trolleys came the ability to move farther away from the city center and establish suburban residences that led to the creation of neighborhoods such as Lower Waverly. Most likely constructed around 1900 by Ernest H. Dent, a butcher at the City Market, this simple cottage was built near a trolley line that originally fed Columbia's first suburb, Shandon. Convenience to work may have led Ralph A. Stevenson, a teacher at Booker T. Washington High School, to buy the cottage with his wife Alberta by 1940. Valued again for its historic character and in-town benefits, this property exemplifies the benefits of rehabilitating historic structures.

Ernest H. Dent may have opted to pay trolley fair so that he could venture from his Lower Waverly community home to his stall at the city market that once stood on Assembly Street.

Circa-1920 map by the Automobile Blue Book Publishing Company, updated with trolley lines indicated in red and railroad lines illustrated in blue
Historic Columbia Foundation collection

Lower Waverly

2226 Senate Street

Close

10

Lower Waverly

Chappelle Memorial A.M.E. Church

Situated on the corner of Pine and Senate streets, today's Chappelle Memorial A.M.E. Church grew from Chappelle Station, an A.M.E. mission church established in 1903. Following World War II, the congregation's size merited construction of the current sanctuary, which was built for $33,000 in 1949 and dedicated the following year. Along with Lower Waverly's other houses of worship, Chappelle Memorial has served as a spiritual, cultural, and social center within the African-American community for generations.

Just as this commemorative marker serves as the foundation of its historic building, churches like Chappelle are considered the cornerstones of their neighborhoods.

 

Lomas Gist details the history of Chappelle Memorial A.M.E. Church

Frankie Point describes going to church on Sunday morning

Lower Waverly

Chappelle Memorial A.M.E. Church

Close

11

Lower Waverly

Holman's Barber Shop

In operation for over 60 years, Holman's is representative of the many barbershops that Lower Waverly once featured. As popular gathering spots where citizens discussed politics, sports, and issues affecting their community, these businesses offered more than just haircuts and shaves. Though fewer in number than decades ago, these commercial landmarks remain an integral part of daily life within the community.

Barbershops and beauty salons once were found in greater numbers within Lower Waverly. In October of 1964, City of Columbia housing inspector Joseph E. Winter photographed this barber school, which once operated at 2357 Stark Street.

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Millwood Avenue and Gervais Street historically have been and remain Lower Waverly's two most important commercial corridors. By 1960, there stood on Gervais Street a mixture of mid-20th-century commercial buildings interspersed with considerably earlier residences. Shown here are the addresses for 2338-2342 Gervais Street, which housed a barbershop and Bell Furniture Company. Today, only the structure that housed the furniture store remains.

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Lower Waverly

Holman's Barber Shop

Close

12

Lower Waverly

Palmetto Seafood

Image courtesy Lucius Moultrie

Unlike contemporary or many post-World War II suburbs, inner ring suburbs, like Lower Waverly, typically featured corner markets or grocery stores. The vitality of these small businesses, so important to urban communities, is embodied in an enduring Gervais Street landmark. Situated along one of the neighborhood's chief commercial corridors, Palmetto Seafood has been synonymous with the neighborhood since July 1, 1961. Owners Lucius and Addy Moultrie purchased this business in 1997 from its founders, Ralph and Josie Floyd, whose family also had established the Cannarella Fish Market and Dixie Fish and Oyster Company in the Congaree Vista.

Palmetto Seafood remains a Lower Waverly landmark thanks to current owners Lucius and Addy Moultrie.

Sam’s Grocery serves the heart of Lower Waverly from its Pendleton Street location.

Some structures within the community served both residential and commercial purposes. Corner stores, such as Crofts Grocery Store at 922 Short Street, photographed in April of 1960, offered citizens not only staple goods but also opportunities to socialize. Some properties became favorite gathering spots or "juke joints" where locals congregated on the weekends.

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Nestled within the inner portions of the neighborhood away from the main commercial streets of Gervais and Millwood, there were other corner stores such as Livingston's Grocery, which shared the two-story building at the corner of Stark and Heidt streets with a barber school.

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Erased by later 20th-century demolition, commercial landmarks, such as 2334 Gervais Street, photographed here in April of 1960, once played an especially vital role within the community in the decades leading up to the civil rights movement.

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Lucius Moultrie recounts the history of Palmetto Seafood and running a community institution

Lower Waverly

Palmetto Seafood

Close

13

Lower Waverly

Waverly Methodist Church/Wheatley Branch Library

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

In his January 16, 1958 image, Joseph Winter captured the view of the 2300 block of Gervais Street, including the sign for the Wheatley Branch Public Library. In the foreground stands 2310 Gervais Street, a two-story structure that a year earlier was home to Mrs. Arietha W. Garmany (maid); Mrs. Amy Thompson; Mrs. Ruby Mims (maid); and James Johnson (a driver with Fleming Trucking), all of whom appear to have rented an apartment within the dwelling.

In 1915, Waverly Methodist Church's congregation commissioned architect J. H. Sams to design its sanctuary at 2314 Gervais Street. Completed by 1917, the facility served its white congregation until 1936, when it was converted into the Phyllis Wheatley Branch of the Richland County Public Library system. Replacing the branch's original location within the black YMCA building at 1429 Park Street, the relocated library became a popular cultural center for the Lower Waverly African-American community until 1972, when the Devine Street Branch replaced it. In 1993, a new facility was established at 913 Woodrow Street and renamed Wheatley in honor of its predecessor.

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of 1956
Map excerpt courtesy South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Lower Waverly

Waverly Methodist Church/Wheatley Branch Library

Close

14

Lower Waverly

M.W. Prince Hall Grand Lodge

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of 1963
Map excerpt courtesy South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Following the Civil War, participation in fraternal orders assumed an important role within the African-American community throughout the South, as notable citizens became members of organizations like the Masons. In 1909 within a former fire station at 1125 Washington Street, Columbia blacks established the Prince Hall Lodge, in honor of the "Father of black masonry." By 1963, the order had purchased enough land on Gervais Street to begin construction on its new building that still stands today. Along with its affiliate organizations, the Knights of Pythogas, the Grand Girls Assembly, and the Order of the Eastern Star, the Lodge is known for facilitating charitable events, including food and clothing drives.

Cornerstone of the M.W. Prince Hall Grand Lodge

Residences once stood on property occupied by the Masonic lodge. Ms. Jean Hopkins formerly lived at 2327 Senate Street where the Masonic Temple and its parking lot rest today. Taken about 1950, this photograph of Harriet McMillan (far left); Maryanne McMillan (back); Shirley Alberta Sanders (far right); Lucy Elizabeth Sanders (front), illustrate Senate Street's mid-20th-century appearance.

Image courtesy Jean Hopkins

The Eastern Star was a benevolent organization founded in 1855, open to both the wives of Masons and Masons themselves. In Columbia, the Eastern Star Chapter would meet in the Masonic Temple at 2314 Gervais Street.

Female members of the Order of the Eastern Star
Image courtesy Folklife Resource Center, McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina

Members of the Prince Hall Lodge are pictured wearing their lodge regalia.

Image courtesy Folklife Resource Center, McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina

Lomas Gist chronicles the process of acquiring land and building the Prince Hall Grand Lodge

Jean Hopkins describes living in a Shotgun style house where the Prince Hall Grand Lodge now stands

Lower Waverly

M.W. Prince Hall Grand Lodge

Close

15

Lower Waverly

Site of Waverly Elementary School

From A True Likeness, The Black South of Richard Samuel Roberts: 1920-1936. © The Estate of Richard Samuel Roberts, by permission of Bruccoli Clark Layman, Inc.
Image courtesy South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Road reorientation and the evolution of Millwood Avenue's commercial enterprises erased a physical link to early education in Lower Waverly. White and black students initially were educated within segregated sections of the Waverly School, established between 1901 and 1903. By 1912, blacks had their own school, known as the Waverly Graded School, which stood at 2329 Gervais Street. By 1949, this institution had moved to 1225 Oak Street, the former location of the Waverly School for white students (shown here), where it operated exclusively for African-American students until its closing in 1958.

What began as Millwood Avenue in the early 20th century became Dillon Street around 1953. The Millwood Avenue that exists today was created south of Gervais and east of old Millwood, now Dillon Street, and is contiguous to Two Notch Road, a connection created by the addition of a road between Lady and Lyon streets during the mid 1900s. This aerial map shows that Millwood Avenue had been repaved and connected to Legare Street by 1951.

Aerial Map of Columbia, 1951
Image courtesy University of South Carolina Map Library

Taken about 1941, this image of Powell's Garage illustrates one of the neighborhood's earlier businesses. Offering both wrecker service and general repairs, Powell's eventually built the structure that today houses another contemporary garage – Nutall's.

Image courtesy C. Powell, III

When Joseph Winter photographed the intersection of Millwood and Gervais streets in April of 1960, he captured the area's commercial and residential elements. Rising above a billboard is the former sign of Powell's Garage, which once operated from what is now Nutall's Tire. 

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Lower Waverly

Site of Waverly Elementary School

Close

16

Lower Waverly

Site of Celia Dial Saxon Home

Among the first African Americans educated at the University of South Carolina during Reconstruction, Celia Dial Saxon (1857- 1935) became one of Columbia's most celebrated educators. Heavily engaged in civic improvements, Saxon helped to found the Fairwold Industrial School for Delinquent Negro Girls; the Wilkinson Orphanage for Negro Children; and the Phillis Wheatley YWCA, home to Columbia's first African-American public library. In 1929, Blossom Street School was renamed in her honor. Twenty-five years later, in 1954, Saxon was recognized again when the Columbia Housing Authority named a new 400-unit complex in the Edgewood neighborhood after her.

Lower Waverly

Site of Celia Dial Saxon Home

Close

17

Lower Waverly

Urban Renewal

In 1956, F.A. Johnson Consulting Group, Inc., in association with Jordan, Jones, & Goulding, introduced a possible renewal plan for the area bordered by Heidt, Millwood, Gervais, and Greene streets. Often identified as "Negro Removal" by displaced black citizens, urban renewal, operating under Columbia's Fight Blight program resulted in either the rehabilitation or demolition of houses deemed dilapidated by city officials. This billboard, photographed on Main Street in May of 1963, illustrates City Hall's commitment to participating in this national movement.

Some buildings were rehabilitated under the efforts of Columbia's Fight Blight program. Between September and November of 1957, Joseph Winter chronicled work performed on 1113 House Street, the home of widow Patsy S. Ceaser, who was born about 1878. By Thanksgiving of that year, the elderly homemaker had benefited from the efforts of local youth who held clean-up days and repaired her home.

This images was taken at 2457 Gervais Street in November of 1967.

Images courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Lower Waverly

Urban Renewal

Close

18

Lower Waverly

Site of J.P. Holley Funeral Home

Image courtesy J.P. Holley Funeral Home

Caring for the departed, undertakers historically have played a special role within Columbia’s African-American community. William S. and Catherine W. Holley established Holley and Sons Funeral Home in 1917 within the Lower Waverly neighborhood. In 1955, under the direction of John P. Holley, Sr., the company assumed its current name and continued to operate from its Senate Street building until that circa-1920 facility was destroyed by fire in 2006. Currently, the family-run enterprise serves the Columbia community from its location at 8132 Garners Ferry Road.

Featuring a fleet of impressive vehicles, the Holley Funeral Home was a Lower Waverly landmark until recent memory.

Image courtesy J.P. Holley Funeral Home

Lower Waverly

Site of J.P. Holley Funeral Home

Close

19

Lower Waverly

Home of George Elmore

From A True Likeness, The Black South of Richard Samuel Roberts: 1920-1936. © The Estate of Richard Samuel Roberts, by permission of Bruccoli Clark Layman, Inc.
Image courtesy South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

George A. Elmore and his wife Laura lived here from 1943 until 1954. Mr. Elmore was heavily invested in the Waverly community, running a Five and Dime store, two liquor stores, a photography business, and driving a cab. He is perhaps best known, however, for his efforts to secure African-American voting rights in South Carolina's state primaries. Unfortunately, Elmore's activism, which led to the 1947 lawsuit Elmore v. Rice resulted in threats to and economic ruin for him and his family.

The Elmore family's former home still remains in Lower Waverly.

Creswell Elmore details his fathers efforts to secure African-American voting rights

Lower Waverly

Home of George Elmore

Close

20

Lower Waverly

Bouler Home

Image courtesy Frankie Point

Identical to houses built to the east of the then all-white neighborhood of Melrose Heights, this Craftsman style bungalow was built about 1930 by Reverend Wade B. Bouler (at right, posing with two unidentified men upon receiving their doctorate degrees from Allen University, circa-1930) in the easternmost section of Lower Waverly. Pastoring a number of churches in South Carolina, including the former Chappelle Station, which later became Chappelle Memorial A.M.E., Bouler is representative of the many African-American leaders within the neighborhood who met the spiritual needs of Columbia’s black community.

The Bouler family’s former home as it appears today

Reverend W.B. Bouler, circa-1930

Image courtesy Frankie Point

Mrs. Mary H. Bouler and Eugenia V. Johnson at 907 Tree Street, circa-1930

Image taken by George Elmore, courtesy Frankie Point

Frankie Point describes the community on Bratton Street

Lower Waverly

Bouler Home

Close

21

Lower Waverly

Effects of Segregated Communities/Community Development

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Like other heavily African-American populated neighborhoods, Lower Waverly received municipal improvements and services that had come to other, more affluent Columbia suburbs decades earlier.

Among the improvements made was street paving. Shown here is a section of Stark Street in 1961 prior to its being paved, as witnessed by City of Columbia housing inspector Joseph Winter.

Many long-time Lower Waverly residents remember sections of their neighborhood blighted by trash. Garbage pick-up did not become a reliable service within the district until the mid-20th century. Columbia's Fight Blight efforts in January of 1967 included remedying such problems found within the Millwood area.

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Durham Carter considers the costs of segregated living on community development

Lower Waverly

Effects of Segregated Communities/Community Development

Close

22

Lower Waverly

Neighborhood Public Art and Beautification Efforts

Lower Waverly features many examples of public art and beautification efforts that each speak to various decades of the neighborhood's history in which members of the community have taken steps to enhance their surroundings. In some cases citizens have made their own improvements that have led them to be recognized through garden and landscape awards. At other times, municipal leaders have imposed beautification projects for the betterment of the entire city. Perhaps one of the most notable examples of this city-imposed work are the jelly palms that line Gervais Street, said to have been planted in preparation for President Eisenhower's visit to the capital city in 1952. Later examples of more citizen-based efforts lie in Millwood Avenue’s colorful murals, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Park’s portrait of its namesake, as well as a handful of stone obelisks that adorn Gervais Street and Millwood Avenue. Self-expression has also come in the form of graffiti, some encouraged, others not, that adorn buildings.

Lower Waverly

Neighborhood Public Art and Beautification Efforts

Close

23

Lower Waverly

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority House

The bonds forged through collegiate fraternities and sororities historically have played important roles within some of Columbia’s African-American population. Today, Zeta Phi Beta sorority members maintain a facility on Pine Street within a former Young Women’s Christian Association building.

Members of Zeta Phi Beta pause for a group photograph at the Shumpert family home at 2309 Lady Street in the early 1950s. The members are as follows: [back row] Annie E. Hanberrry; Celie Adams; Fannie Phelps Adams; unidentified woman; Mrs. (first name unidentified) Black; Bessie Mae Shumpert; Ethel Johnson Finley; Norma Ruff; [front row] Mrs.(first name unidentified) Lindsey; Otelia Brown; unidentified woman; Frances Pearl Shumpert; unidentified woman.

Images courtesy Gloria James

Lower Waverly

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority House

Close

24

Lower Waverly

1004 Short Street

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Columbia City Directories for 1950 and 1960 listed 1004 Short Street as Taylor Memorial Baptist Church. Joseph Winter recorded the appearance of the African-American congregation’s sanctuary while photographing Lower Waverly sites in April of 1960.

Lower Waverly

1004 Short Street

Close

25

Lower Waverly

2400 Block Bratton Street

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

This revitalized Shotgun style house was located on the 2400 block of Bratton Street and was photographed by Joseph Winter in May of 1957 as an example of the benefits of urban revitalization.

Lower Waverly

2400 Block Bratton Street

Close

26

Lower Waverly

2595 Cherry Street

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Children pose in front of this 19th-century house at 2595 Cherry Street for Columbia Housing Authority employee Joseph Winter on May 10, 1961.

Lower Waverly

2595 Cherry Street

Close

27

Lower Waverly

2338 Gervais Street

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Listed in 1957 and 1958 as a part of Bell Furniture Company, 2338 Gervais Street was not listed in the 1960 Columbia City Directory and appears vacant in this photograph taken by Joseph Winter in April of 1960. The dark diagonal lines on its façade reveal the house once featured a front porch, like many other earlier houses within the neighborhood.

Lower Waverly

2338 Gervais Street

Close

28

Lower Waverly

2354 Gervais Street

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Listed as Hudson Barbershop in the 1950 and 1960 Columbia City Directories, 2354 Gervais Street is pictured here in July of 1960.

Lower Waverly

2354 Gervais Street

Close

29

Lower Waverly

Pendleton, Short & Millwood Streets

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

This perspective of Pendleton, Short, and Millwood streets, taken April 8, 1960, illustrates that many of the streets within Lower Waverly remained unpaved in the decades after World War II.

Lower Waverly

Pendleton, Short & Millwood Streets

Close

30

Lower Waverly

Millwood Area Residents

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

During his photography sessions within various Columbia neighborhoods, Housing Authority inspector Joseph Winter trained his camera lens on people as well as buildings and streetscapes. This group of currently unidentified Lower Waverly teenagers posed for Winter on December 19, 1961 at what appears to be a church or community center.

Lower Waverly

Millwood Area Residents

Close

31

Lower Waverly

2104 Pendleton Street

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Originally a store, the family's home had changed dramatically by September 20, 1957 through revitalization efforts.

Cement finisher John Henry, Jr. and his wife Lula lived at 2104 Pendleton Street in August of 1957 when this series of photographs was taken by Joseph Winter.

 

 

Images courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Lower Waverly

2104 Pendleton Street

Close

32

Lower Waverly

2108 Pendleton Street

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

The home of John Blanks at 2108 Pendleton Street was photographed in December of 1960 by Joseph Winter as a part of the city’s Fight Blight program.

Lower Waverly

2108 Pendleton Street

Close

33

Lower Waverly

2211 Pendleton Street

Image courtesy Joseph Winter Collection, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

This early bungalow at 2211 Pendleton Street was photographed by Joseph Winter in February of 1967. Many houses found within the Lower Waverly community were identical in form and style to those located within other early Columbia suburbs.

Lower Waverly

2211 Pendleton Street

Close