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  1. Old Shandon Streetcar Line Devine and Maple Streets
  2. Old Shandon Schneider Elementary School/The GranDevine 705 Maple Street
  3. Old Shandon Commercial Development 700 Block of Woodrow Street
  4. Old Shandon Smith House 720 Queen Street
  5. Old Shandon Smith House 720 Queen Street
  6. Old Shandon Columbia Star Office 723 Queen Street
  7. Old Shandon Hall Court Apartments Southwest Corner of Lee & Meadow Streets
  8. Old Shandon Valley Park/Martin Luther King, Jr. Park Santee Street / 2300 Greene Street
  9. Old Shandon Queen Anne Style House 909 King Street
  10. Old Shandon Neighborhood Trends 900 Block of King Street
  11. Old Shandon Early Residence 2601 Cypress Street
  12. Old Shandon Moved Houses Southwest Corner of Cypress & King Streets
  13. Old Shandon Former French Consulate 2608 Cypress Street
  14. Old Shandon Trends in Ownership 2527 & 2529 Cypress Street
  15. Old Shandon The Virginia Apartments 900-904 Woodrow Street
  16. Old Shandon Heyward-Allen-Burnett House 830 Maple Street
  17. Old Shandon Shandon United Methodist Church/Maple Street Southern Methodist Church 831 Maple Street
  18. Old Shandon Davis House 2726 Preston Street
  19. Old Shandon Clark-Hubbard House 2719 Preston Street
  20. Old Shandon Shandon Baptist Church/Bethel A.M.E. Church 819 Woodrow Street
  21. Old Shandon Site of Betty Stockman's School of Dance 815 Woodrow Street
  22. Old Shandon Change Over Time 900 Block of Woodrow Street
  23. Old Shandon Location of Centennial Celebration 2700 Block of Preston Street
  24. Old Shandon Rehabilitation on Maple Street 900 Block of Maple Street
  25. Old Shandon Epworth Children's Home Bounded by Millwood Avenue, Sims Avenue, Devine Street, & Old Shandon
  26. Old Shandon Shandon Square 2700 Block of Cypress Street
  27. Old Shandon King Street Store 800 Block of King Street
  28. Old Shandon 700 Block of Meadow Street 700 Block of Meadow Street

1

Old Shandon

Streetcar Line

 

Electric streetcar on the corner of Woodrow and Devine streets, ca. 1905.
Historic Columbia Foundation collection

Mass transit for Columbians came about in 1886 with the advent of mule- (and later horse-) drawn streetcars along Main Street and Elmwood Avenue, a service superseded in 1893 by electrified cars. By 1898, the Columbia Electric Street and Suburban Railway and Electric Power Company had extended its tracks southeast on Devine Street and north on Maple Street to Millwood Avenue. For five cents, passengers could ride one of six trolley cars accessing Shandon every hour. Affordable and convenient, streetcars were many Shandonites' primary mode of transportation. In 1927, the city's streetcar service was terminated as buses and private cars had outpaced their competitor.

The increasing prosperity of many of Shandon's middle-class families during the 1920s coincided with the rise of personally owned automobiles. This trend resulted in the conversion of barns originally housing horses and carriages into garages, and, in some cases, led to the construction of free-standing garages located to the rear of houses. Pictured here are Braxton Bragg "B.B" Davis and his wife Ada of 2726 Preston Street posing beside their car.

Image courtesy Betty Jean Rhyne
Shirley Black Brown remembers catching the street car.

Old Shandon

Streetcar Line

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2

Old Shandon

Schneider Elementary School/The GranDevine

Schneider Elementary School first grade class, 1936

Image courtesy Leland Williams

In 1909, the new Shandon School consisted of a six-room brick building staffed by Principal S.M. Buddy and six teachers instructing 274 students. The school grew over time to accommodate growing enrollment and was renamed in honor of another former principal, Samuel P. Schneider in 1937. This community landmark remained a school until its closing in 1974. Today, the building functions as a condominium complex offering upscale residential life within a repurposed historic setting.

Mary Sease, pictured here in 1941, taught Physical Education at Schneider Elementary School.

Image courtesy Leland Williams

Ms. Roy's Second Grade class at Schneider Elementary School, 1958

Image courtesy The State newspaper

Taken in 1983, this image depicts Schneider Elementary School before its rehabilitation into apartments.

Image courtesy The State newspaper

Today, GranDevine condominiums are located within the old Schneider Elementary School building. Developers David Bryant and Ben Arnold received an Historic Columbia Foundation historic preservation award for their adaptive reuse project in 2008.

 

Old Shandon

Schneider Elementary School/The GranDevine

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3

Old Shandon

Commercial Development

Historic Columbia Foundation collection

Like other suburban neighborhoods, Old Shandon has attempted to strike a balance between its residential and commercial interests. Predictably, greater numbers of businesses have been established most heavily along major corridors such as Devine Street and Millwood Avenue. Occasionally, this shift results in significant changes to the historic fabric of the community, as this circa-1905 image of Woodrow Street looking north from Devine Street attests.

Construction of The Whitney Hotel in the early 1980s prompted the fortunate relocation of the residence that originally stood at 702 Woodrow Street.

Historic Columbia Foundation collection

At the time this map was drawn by the Sanborn Fire Insurance company in 1919, the property was home to Mrs. Martha F. Sutphen, a widowed stenographer for the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York who would continue living on Woodrow Street through the 1940s. This document illustrates the historic context within which the home once stood.

Moved to 4840 Portabello Road within Columbia's Lake Katherine subdivision, the two-story wood frame house blends well with its new, contemporary neighbors.

Judy Hubbard reflects on the development of residential and commercial properties in Old Shandon.

Old Shandon

Commercial Development

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4

Old Shandon

Smith House

Joel A. Smith, Sr. and his wife Beulah Lever Smith built their impressive Queen Street residence in 1913. Here the couple and their six children maintained a small "farm" consisting of a barn, chicken coop, a pigeon flyer, and stables where they kept a horse and carriage. In 1921, the property received a unique addition—a miniature bungalow playhouse by Smith’s company, Palmetto Lumber, which served as an entry in a Shriners Parade.

Joel A. Smith, Sr. and his wife Beulah Smith

Two of the Smith children, Natalie and Beulah, were photographed with an unidentified nanny from across Queen Street looking back toward the family's home, circa-1918.

An extension to the electric trolley line in 1917 made Camp Jackson the final stop on the Shandon line. The influx of troops during the late 1910s in training for World War I led to the division of existing Shandon residences that were then rented to wives and families of soldiers. This trend was sustained by the depression and the Second World War.

Here two military personnel, who rented rooms at the Smith house and "commuted" to Fort Jackson, pose for an unidentified photographer.

Further soldiers and their wives came to call the Smith residence their temporary home during World War II. Jane and Arnold Bultema from Grand Rapids, Michigan stayed with the Smiths during 1943.

The following year Violet and Tony Pinto boarded at the Queen Street residence.

Images courtesy the Smith family

Old Shandon

Smith House

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Old Shandon

Smith House

Joel A. Smith, Sr. and his wife Beulah Lever Smith built their impressive Queen Street residence in 1913. Here the couple and their six children maintained a small "farm" consisting of a barn, chicken coop, a pigeon flyer, and stables where they kept a horse and carriage. In 1921, the property received a unique addition—a miniature bungalow playhouse by Smith’s company, Palmetto Lumber, which served as an entry in a Shriners Parade.

Joel A. Smith, Sr. and his wife Beulah Smith

Two of the Smith children, Natalie and Beulah, were photographed with an unidentified nanny from across Queen Street looking back toward the family's home, circa-1918.

An extension to the electric trolley line in 1917 made Camp Jackson the final stop on the Shandon line. The influx of troops during the late 1910s in training for World War I led to the division of existing Shandon residences that were then rented to wives and families of soldiers. This trend was sustained by the depression and the Second World War.

Here two military personnel, who rented rooms at the Smith house and "commuted" to Fort Jackson, pose for an unidentified photographer.

Further soldiers and their wives came to call the Smith residence their temporary home during World War II. Jane and Arnold Bultema from Grand Rapids, Michigan stayed with the Smiths during 1943.

The following year Violet and Tony Pinto boarded at the Queen Street residence.

Images courtesy the Smith family

Old Shandon

Smith House

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6

Old Shandon

Columbia Star Office

Image courtesy the Smith family

Matilda McNeil purchased this lot in 1913 for $1,450 and soon after constructed this two-story Colonial Revival style house. From this 1952 image of James Alex Shuford, taken at his family's home across the street, the original appearance of 723 Queen Street can be seen in the background. The shallow, façade-width porch has since been removed. A single-family home until the 1980s, the property subsequently was put to commercial use like other Old Shandon residences. Since 1998, the property has been home to the Columbia Star.

Old Shandon

Columbia Star Office

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7

Old Shandon

Hall Court Apartments

Previously undeveloped lots at the corner of Lee and Meadow streets were filled in 1949 with the construction of Hall Court Apartments. The three buildings with four apartments each that fronted Meadow Street were finished first and were occupied by middle- to upper-class white families, many of whom were supported by managerial positions. By 1950, two additional apartment buildings were added to the Lee Street side of the lot, bringing the total number of apartments to twenty. Apartment living became a popular trend beginning in the 1920s and continued through the years following World War II.

Between 1910 and 1912, Maple, Lee and Woodrow streets experienced considerable development with the construction of bungalows in the popular Craftsman-style and larger Prairie-style houses. With the boom of the 1920s, development soon pushed outward from the initial concentration of housing along the rail lines. Purpose-built duplexes and residences modified into apartments (such as this former single family American Foursquare dwelling at 929-931 Maple Street) followed, offering housing options for a greater density of residents within the maturing suburb.

Merritt and John Cely roll past the single-family home-turned duplex of 2711 Preston Street circa-1947.

Image courtesy Mary Wylie Conniffe Cely

Old Shandon

Hall Court Apartments

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8

Old Shandon

Valley Park/Martin Luther King, Jr. Park

Image courtesy Warner Montgomery, previously published in Shandon Memories

Shandon's developers believed the key to ensuring their suburb's success lay in building residences and in creating public destinations. Within Valley Park they established the Shandon Pavilion to offer resort-like diversions to local citizens and tourists. Convenient access to the Pavilion came from the Columbia Electric Street and Suburban Railway and Electric Power Company, which extended its streetcar service into the new suburb in 1894. Grand plans for the resort never materialized. However, Valley Park did become the center for much community life, albeit for only white citizens during the years before integration. Here, Old Shandon residents attended dances and concerts, as well as participated in sporting events.

Sports teams were among the favorite pastimes at Valley Park.

Images courtesy Warner Montgomery, previously published in Shandon Memories

Warner Montgomery shares his days playing neighborhood ball in Valley Park.

Old Shandon

Valley Park/Martin Luther King, Jr. Park

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9

Old Shandon

Queen Anne Style House

Image courtesy Old Shandon Centennial

One of Old Shandon's most recognizable landmarks, this residence recently underwent a sensitive rehabilitation. Located atop a ridge that divides the neighborhood from west to east, this circa-1900 Queen Anne style house was the home of salesman William Lockwood Bennett for over 40 years. Unique to this property is the large parcel of undeveloped land to the south, which speaks to the spacious tracts once associated with some of the community's original houses.

Owners William Lockwood Bennett and Margaret Porter Brooks Bennett relax in the yard of their King Street home, circa-1940.

Image courtesy Old Shandon Centennial

The property's current owners have spent several years meticulously rehabilitating their residence in an historically sympathetic fashion.

Old Shandon

Queen Anne Style House

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10

Old Shandon

Neighborhood Trends

Image courtesy the MacLauchlin family

King Street's evolution mimicked that of other streets throughout the neighborhood. Here two- and one-story houses accommodated residents representing a cross-section of solely white professionals and skilled laborers. The 1910 City Directory reveals this blend of citizens. Within the five homes listed were two managers, a grocer, a blacksmith, and a machinist. Binding these various households was the neighborly interaction provided by porches, a practice that waned throughout America following the introduction of air conditioning as a standard household feature.

By the 1920s, the MacLauchlin family lived at 908 King Street. Pictured here are William and Ellen MacLauchlin running their "store." Ellen would grow up to be an employee at Dreher High School where she taught home economics from 1952 to 1978.

Image courtesy the MacLauchlin family

The MacLauchlin family's former home as it appears today is yet another example of sympathetic revitalization of the suburb's earlier residences.

Due to their proximity to the University of South Carolina and the amenities of Five Points, many Old Shandon dwellings have become popular housing options for college students, as this American Foursquare that houses members of a fraternity.

Leslie Skinner describes the adaptive use of large homes during lean times.

Old Shandon

Neighborhood Trends

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11

Old Shandon

Early Residence

Many of Old Shandon's earliest residences reflect the Queen Anne style, which was popular at the turn of the 19th century. Built by a local developer in 1894 to spur interest in Shandon, this house was rented for many years by an artisan who taught stonemasonry at Epworth Orphanage. By 1910, grocer J.A. Platt owned the property that today stands as a tangible link to the neighborhood's earliest years.

Old Shandon

Early Residence

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12

Old Shandon

Moved Houses

On this site originally stood the home of Shandon's first resident, Captain Eugene Bowen "Boney" Chase. A conductor for 42 years on the Southern Railway, Chase had a Queen Ann style residence built on this lot for $2,200 in 1893. The house, illustrated in the Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of 1919, remained standing until 1969, when it was destroyed by the Columbia Fire Department during a training exercise. In 1978, one antebellum and six early 20th-century houses were relocated to the vacant lot by Rudy and Jeannette Barnes as an historic infill project.

The properties involved in the creation of this village-like setting came from three different sources. While a few were moved only a block from the intersection of Millwood Avenue and Woodrow Street, others were relocated from several parcels significantly farther away. Shown here are the buildings being situated on their new lots.

Image courtesy Rudy Barnes

The Barnes family utilized the main floor of these historic structures as the basis for rehabilitated homes that featured more dormers and elements not found within their original designs. The end result was an area of dense residential use that shared common paths and landscape treatments.

Old Shandon

Moved Houses

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13

Old Shandon

Former French Consulate

Image courtesy the Library of Congress

First located at 1924 Main Street, as seen here in C. Drie's 1872 Birdseye Map of Columbia, this cottage was once the French Consulate to the Confederacy. According to eyewitnesses, the building, under a French flag, was the only structure spared from the fire that destroyed Main Street when Union forces occupied the city in February 1865. Sixty years later, the house was given to Frederick G. Swaffield, Jr. who moved it to 1301 Barnwell Street. When the city rezoned that area for commercial use, the house was moved to this site in 1977 and rehabilitated.

Old Shandon

Former French Consulate

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Old Shandon

Trends in Ownership

Many Old Shandon residences have interconnected histories. Constructed by 1919, 2529 Cypress Street (shown here) was built by Hugh W. Scott. His brother, World War I veteran Lawrence P. Scott, Sr., erected the dwelling next door at 2527 Cypress Street in 1922. Both residences later became homes to African-American families with teaching backgrounds. With the neighborhood initially intended as an exclusively white community, this shift in its racial composition mirrored trends within other early suburbs during the latter half of the 20th century.

One of the African-American families who moved into Old Shandon following desegregation, Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Lewis lived at 2527 Cypress Street until 2002. A.J. Lewis Greenview Elementary School is named for this property's former owner.

Image courtesy Old Shandon Centennial

Sarah and Hoyt Burnett purchased the Lewis' residence and performed sensitive rehabilitation work that maintained the historic bungalow's character.

Old Shandon

Trends in Ownership

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Old Shandon

The Virginia Apartments

Occasionally, dwellings within Old Shandon were converted to accommodate boarders during the World Wars and for later generations of renters. Many of these properties have been returned to their original single-family layouts. However, the transformation of the Queen Anne style property into the Virginia Apartments has proved more permanent. Built about 1905, this landmark was rehabilitated for multiple-occupant housing around 1930 and named after its owner, Miss Virginia Beckham.

When the Sanborn Fire Insurance Company drew its maps of the Old Shandon neighborhood in 1919, it recorded the original footprint of what would become the Virginia Apartments. By comparing this document with the contemporary appearance of the property, the changes made during the rehabilitation are revealed. Most notable are the loss of the building's front one-story porch and the creation of a side entrance and second-story porch on the dwelling's northwest, or left front, corner.

Old Shandon

The Virginia Apartments

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16

Old Shandon

Heyward-Allen-Burnett House

Originally situated along the streetcar line, this circa-1910 Craftsman-style bungalow is representative of many Maple Street residences erected on one of the neighborhood's main thoroughfares. Initially home to plumbing contractor Edmund A. Heyward, the property was later owned by John B. Allen, whose family established Allen Brothers Milling Company, manufacturer of Adluh Flour. Recently, this house returned to private ownership after having been among a handful of parcels owned by Epworth Children's Home to the east.

Memories from a Past Resident

Former resident Dorothy "Dot" Allen Edgerton remembers her home once featuring a detached building, some distance from the house occupied by a domestic worker who traveled with the family when John B. Allen moved it from North Carolina to Columbia. The 1919 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map reveals that building once stood in the northeast corner of the property, was oriented to the east, facing Epworth Orphanage (now called Epworth Children's Home), and carried the address of 830 ½ Maple Street. Also delineated is the footprint of the property's auto garage, an amenity that had become common among many of the suburb's residences.

During World War II, the family's milling company worked around the clock to meet the demands of orders from the military and the home front. Pictured here is the Allen Brothers' Milling Company as it appeared during the 1940s in today's Congaree Vista.

Image courtesy Jack and Betsy Edgerton

Dorothy Allen relaxes in her home's garden, circa-1945.

Image courtesy Dorothy Allen Edgerton

Old Shandon

Heyward-Allen-Burnett House

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17

Old Shandon

Shandon United Methodist Church/Maple Street Southern Methodist Church

Image courtesy Leland Williams

The original sanctuary for Shandon Methodist Church was erected shortly after 1909 but destroyed by fire in 1914. This Richardsonian Romanesque style structure was completed as a replacement the following year. By 1931, the congregation had outgrown its building and educational facilities, prompting the move to the old Heathwood School at the intersection of Devine Street and Millwood Avenue. In 1933, a Christian Adventist group purchased the church buildings on Preston Street, selling it six years later to a Southern Methodist congregation, which remains at the site today.

Many hands make light work as members of Shandon Methodist Church's congregation erect their Sunday school building over the course of one day in 1921.

The Sunday school building was built in between the west elevation of the sanctuary and 2728 Preston Street.

Images courtesy Shandon United Methodist Church

Old Shandon

Shandon United Methodist Church/Maple Street Southern Methodist Church

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Old Shandon

Davis House

Image courtesy Betty Jean Rhyne

Within Old Shandon stand residences whose owners represent third and fourth generations of the families who built them. Erected in 1915 by Braxton Bragg Davis (shown here in 1935 with Ada Boland Davis, Betty Jean Rhyne, and Mildred Davis Rhyne) as a single-family dwelling, this house was converted into a triplex during the Depression to support the influx of people into the city center. It remains as apartments with one of its addresses maintained by a descendant of the original owner.

Old Shandon

Davis House

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Old Shandon

Clark-Hubbard House

Image courtesy Judy and Pat Hubbard

Throughout Old Shandon stand properties with legacies from generations of previous owners. This is particularly true for this circa-1915 dwelling, whose second owners, the J. Rhett Clark family, installed extensive gardens in the 1920s. Purchasing the house in 1977, current owners Judy and Pat Hubbard retained the gardens' historic elements while adding further plants, hardscape, and amenities. An historic pole barn standing at the rear of the half-acre property has been converted into an artist's studio.

Retaining an ornamental fishpond and original heritage plants and shrubs, including boxwoods, camellias, and crape myrtles, the Clark House had "good bones" on which the Hubbard family added its own amenities. Though unkempt at the time the family purchased the property, these garden elements, such as the decades-old crape myrtle seen here behind the house, remained a tie to another generation's interest in gardening.

Work began on the property's gardens before the family actually moved into the house. Seen here is Pat Hubbard in 1977 with plans for a life's-worth of cultivating his and Judy's “new” yard.

Images courtesy Judy and Pat Hubbard

Taken from across Preston Street, this photograph of Mildred Davis Rhyne during the 1910s shows the Clark House in the background. Lacking trees and plants, the property at that point had yet been cultivated, leaving an unobstructed view of houses near Millwood Avenue to its north.

Image courtesy Betty Jean Rhyne

Old Shandon

Clark-Hubbard House

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Old Shandon

Shandon Baptist Church/Bethel A.M.E. Church

Image courtesy Leland Williams

For almost 85 years Shandon Baptist Church was a fixture within Old Shandon. The congregation's first sanctuary was erected on the corner of Woodrow and Preston streets in 1909. Today's Neoclassical building replaced that sanctuary in 1939. Shandon Baptist Church relocated to Forest Drive in 1995 to expand its campus. Since then, Bethel A.M.E. Church, whose congregation formerly worshipped at the corner of Sumter and Taylor streets, has made the neighborhood its home.

The original sanctuary of Shandon Baptist Church, which stood on the corner of Preston and Woodrow streets, was markedly different in design from what followed.

Image courtesy Warner Montgomery, previously published in Shandon Memories

Old Shandon

Shandon Baptist Church/Bethel A.M.E. Church

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21

Old Shandon

Site of Betty Stockman's School of Dance

Image courtesy Betty Stockman

Having grown up at 815 Woodrow Street, Betty Stockman worked at Roy McCullough's School of Dance from 1950 through 1960 before assuming its ownership. Renamed, the studio remained a venue for generations of aspiring dancers who studied under Stockman for over three decades. Expansion of Shandon Baptist Church in the early 1980s led to the demolition of Stockman's house and the neighboring Woodrow Street property behind which stood the studio. Despite the loss of these structures, memories of Stockman's time in Old Shandon remain vivid.

Stockman's home fronted Woodrow Street where today a parking lot for Bethel A.M.E. Church rests. Shown here in the days before its demolition, 815 Woodrow Street bears a similarity to many other Old Shandon dwellings that remain standing.

Images courtesy Betty Stockman

Betty Stockman describes everyday life in Old Shandon.

Old Shandon

Site of Betty Stockman's School of Dance

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Old Shandon

Change Over Time

Of all of the streets within Old Shandon, Woodrow Street has experienced the greatest changes since the suburb's earliest days. In a handful of areas, formerly residential properties have yielded to commercial purposes, resulting in the destruction of historic dwellings or their heavy modification. The enlargement of some neighborhood institutions and the creation of others have erased multiple residential properties in some blocks. However, this street, which has become one of the community's most heavily traveled corridors, nonetheless retains much of its historic character through community involvement in new development.

Where Bethel A.M.E. Child Development Center rests today, most recently stood a two-story brick Colonial Revival style house erected by Shandon Baptist Church for its parsonage. However, within this block originally stood a series of wood frame houses. Included among them was the residence of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Dillard at 905 Woodrow Street, shown here during a snowfall in 1935.

Joseph Samuel Dillard, seen here in the 1920s, benefits from the efforts of a hearty goat! From this perspective, the photographer also captured some of the porch details of the Dillard home as well as that of their neighbors' house to the south.

Images courtesy Sandy Dillard

The Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of 1919 depicts not only a two-story, wood frame house that had a commanding view of both Cypress and Woodrow streets, but also two other one-story dependencies, or support buildings. During the community's earliest years such structures included barns, sheds, "auto" garages, and in the case of some larger homes, quarters for domestic workers.

Today's Wheatley Branch library, constructed in 1993, at 931 Woodrow Street rests on land that formerly was part of a large tract comprising one-fourth of the entire block.

Old Shandon

Change Over Time

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Old Shandon

Location of Centennial Celebration

Among Old Shandon streets, the 2700 block of Preston Street has been anchored by long-time residents, often representing multiple generations of families. From this area have come some of the suburb’s most energetic civic activists who have worked toward preserving both the memories and buildings that make Old Shandon special. In 2004, many long-time and newer residents invited former Old Shandonites back to the neighborhood for its centennial celebration. The heart of the celebration took place along Preston and Maple streets, which contain the bulk of the historic residences included within the Old Shandon Historic District, listed within the National Register of Historic Places in 2003.

 

Images courtesy Judy and Pat Hubbard

Old Shandon

Location of Centennial Celebration

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Old Shandon

Rehabilitation on Maple Street

Like many other streets throughout Old Shandon, Maple has experienced considerable rehabilitation of its historic residences over the past two decades. This circa-1906 home at 928 Maple Street exemplifies that trend. Converted into apartments about 1915 by the Scott family, the structure has been returned to its original configuration by Leslie and Ed Skinner who purchased the dwelling in 2000. While the property’s cow stall, house barn, garage, and plumbed privy have not survived, the original contractor’s house, built prior to the home, remains.

Old Shandon

Rehabilitation on Maple Street

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Old Shandon

Epworth Children's Home

Epworth Orphanage student body and faculty, circa-1935.

To the east of Old Shandon lies a community that has been a neighbor since the suburb's earliest years. Opened in 1896 as Epworth Orphanage, this Methodist-based institution was erected on property formerly occupied by the old Congaree Racetrack. In addition to its approximately 29.5-acre campus, Epworth also maintained a working 101.5-acre farm on what previously had been called the "Baughman Tract."

From its onset, Epworth was championed by the Methodist Church for its prime location just outside of the capital city. Situated on land that lent itself well to variety of agricultural and mechanical pursuits, Epworth's campus soon came to feature a school, print shop, marble yard, and farm, all of which underwrote the institution's expenses while teaching students life skills. As with other schools, Epworth also offered a variety of extracurricular activities such as sports and band. Like the suburb to its west, Epworth grew over succeeding generations. Adding more buildings and staff to accommodate greater numbers of children, the institution changed its name to the Epworth Children's Home in 1951. Over a century after its founding, Epworth’s history remains intertwined with that of Old Shandon, Columbia's oldest suburb.

Sporting outfits provided by the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Epworth's band is seen here in about 1940.

Residents of Epworth Orphanage bake cookies in the institution's kitchen during the late 1940s.

Images courtesy Epworth Children's Home

Old Shandon

Epworth Children's Home

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Old Shandon

Shandon Square

Interest in developing architecturally sympathetic in-fill housing is a testament to Old Shandon's popularity and integrity. Initially solely residential, this block became the location for South Carolina Educational Television's (SCETV) studio by the mid-20th century. With SCETV's relocation to Shop Road, the site became an attractive option for redevelopment. Today, there stand several two-story wood frame residences that have drawn inspiration for some of their design elements from neighboring bungalows and American Foursquares.

Old Shandon

Shandon Square

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Old Shandon

King Street Store

Frank Sloan, William MacLauchlin, and Emma (last name unknown) pose in front of the boys' "store on wheels" along King Street in 1933.

The boys’ menu speaks to their diversified offerings.

Images courtesy the MacLauchlin family

Old Shandon

King Street Store

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Old Shandon

700 Block of Meadow Street

Images courtesy Leland Williams

These photographs taken several years apart in front of their 722 Meadow Street home capture Leland and Loren Williams' early modes of transportation.

Old Shandon

700 Block of Meadow Street

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