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  1. Forest Hills Wade Hampton III Monument Island at Stratford Road and Westminster Drive
  2. Forest Hills 1414 Cambridge Lane 1414 Cambridge Lane
  3. Forest Hills A Floridian Influence 1400 Cambridge Lane
  4. Forest Hills Colonial Revival in Forest Hills 2605 Canterbury Road
  5. Forest Hills John W. Lillard House 1318 Westminster Drive
  6. Forest Hills Benjamin Abney House 1400 Westminster Drive
  7. Forest Hills Deems Haltiwanger House 1411 Westminster Drive
  8. Forest Hills John A. Manning House 2626 Stratford Road
  9. Forest Hills Housing as Investment in Forest Hills 1420 Devonshire Drive
  10. Forest Hills The Tiger Killer’s Home 2708 Stratford Road
  11. Forest Hills A Gift by Design 1431 Wellington Drive
  12. Forest Hills Allways 2808 Forest Drive
  13. Forest Hills Special Delivery 2836 Stratford Road
  14. Forest Hills Postwar Modernism 2859 Stratford Road
  15. Forest Hills The Bagnal-Nettles Influence 2928 Delano Drive
  16. Forest Hills An Illuminated Block 2840 Sheffield Road
  17. Forest Hills 2804 Sheffield Road 2804 Sheffield Road
  18. Forest Hills Charles H. Barron House 1311 Wellington Drive
  19. Forest Hills The “Little Parks” of Forest Hills Intersection of Canterbury Road and Wellington Drive
  20. Forest Hills James B. Urquhart House 2803 Canterbury Road
  21. Forest Hills Joseph L. Nettles House 1218 Wellington Drive
  22. Forest Hills Brotherly Love 2717 Canterbury Road
  23. Forest Hills Cosmo L. Walker House 1307 Devonshire Drive
  24. Forest Hills Eugene H. Salmon House 1211 Devonshire Drive
  25. Forest Hills Heyward Singley House 2555 Gervais Street

1

Forest Hills

Wade Hampton III Monument

Erected by the Sons of Confederate Veterans in 1957, this monument commemorates the life and public service of Wade Hampton III (1818 – 1902). It stands 125 feet northeast of the site where his home, Diamond Hill, was located. The original property was burned by Union troops in February 1865. The monument is constructed out of foundation stones from the historic house. It is the only remnant of the original property within the district. 

Wade Hampton III, taken by an unidentified photographer between 1860 and 1870. Image courtesy Library of Congress

Forest Hills

Wade Hampton III Monument

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2

Forest Hills

1414 Cambridge Lane

This 1939 Colonial Revival house was built for Rufus Clarke (1900 – 1983) and his wife, Alice Childs Clark (1904 – 1982), by her father, the prominent Columbia architect James B. Uruqhart (1876 – 1971). Clarke was a major league baseball pitcher in the 1920s for the Detroit Tigers and Baltimore Orioles. He also served as the president of the Federal Land Bank of Columbia and as a Columbia city councilman.

Forest Hills

1414 Cambridge Lane

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3

Forest Hills

A Floridian Influence

Built in 1938 for Dr. Samuel Edward Wheeler (1890  1957) and his wife, Dorothy Wood Wheeler (1895  1988), this Spanish Colonial Revival house features a stucco-over-frame construction. Mrs. Wheeler reportedly said that she chose the unusual architectural style because she loved Florida. This house stands out among its surroundings because of materials, as well as the arch motif seen in its windows and entrances. Dr. Wheeler practiced medicine in Columbia from 1915 until his death in 1957. He also served as the medical director of the South Carolina Red Cross Regional Board Center.

Forest Hills

A Floridian Influence

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4

Forest Hills

Colonial Revival in Forest Hills

Constructed in 1932, this house was designed by the Lafaye & Lafaye architectural firm in the Colonial Revival style. The house was built for Paul Anderson Cooper (1889 – 1956), who served as Columbia city attorney for 23 years, and his wife, Margaret (1893 – 1986). It features a side-gabled roof and a symmetrical design flanked by a side-gabled porch and a two-story wing. The Colonial Revival style was quite popular in the 1930s and is demonstrated in many homes in the Forest Hills neighborhood.

Forest Hills

Colonial Revival in Forest Hills

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5

Forest Hills

John W. Lillard House

This asymmetrical, rectangular, two-story, brick veneer Georgian Revival style house was originally owned by John Wigfall Lillard (1877 – 1941) and his wife, Mary Frances (1877 – 1944). The Lillard’s were among the first eleven families to reside in Forest Hills. Lillard was an insurance executive active in Columbia business and society in the early twentieth century, serving as chairman of the board of directors of the Columbia Chamber of Commerce and acting in a leadership role in many local clubs, including the Columbia branch of the Travelers Protective Association of America, a fraternal benefit society for traveling salesmen.

John Wigfall Lillard, Reprinted from South Carolina, Special Limited Edition, 1920

Forest Hills

John W. Lillard House

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6

Forest Hills

Benjamin Abney House

Constructed in 1903, this Georgian Revival house is the oldest residence in the Forest Hills Historic District. It predates the existence of the neighborhood by over two decades. Originally owned by Benjamin Lindsey Abney (1858 – 1921), a prominent Columbia lawyer active in the industrial development of the city and region, this house and the approximately 90 acres within its original property would eventually become the Forest Hills neighborhood.

Benjamin Lindsey Abney. From Abney's copy of J. C. Hemphill's Men of Mark in South Carolina, Volume IV, 1909

Forest Hills

Benjamin Abney House

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7

Forest Hills

Deems Haltiwanger House

This 1939 Tudor Revival house is one of three properties said to be located on the site where the plantation Diamond Hill, owned by Wade Hampton III (1818 – 1902), once stood. The house was originally owned by Deems Haltiwanger (1897 – 1997), and his first wife, Rosa Lee (1899 – 1980). Haltiwanger was the founder and president of Richland Shale Products Company. Wyatt Hibbs, a senior architect for the James B. Urquhart firm, designed the structure, which features decorative patterns in the cornice, porch walls and porch gable.  

Forest Hills

Deems Haltiwanger House

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8

Forest Hills

John A. Manning House

This 1936 Tudor Revival house was designed by Lafaye & Lafaye for General Electric’s New American Home Contest, which aimed to provide communities with archetypical modern homes. The house was built with the intent of drawing public attention to the possible amenities available for comfort, health and convenience in home construction, and it drew acclaim and recognition for the Forest Hills neighborhood. Its first resident was John Adger Manning (1899 – 1986), a Columbia lawyer who came from a family that had produced five South Carolina governors.

Forest Hills

John A. Manning House

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9

Forest Hills

Housing as Investment in Forest Hills

This 1937 Colonial Revival house was the result of an unusual transaction between a builder and a University of South Carolina professor of education. John Jameson, the owner of the land, arranged to sell the land to his neighbors, Dr. Joseph McTyeire Daniel (1896 – 1970) and his wife, Frances Gibson Daniel (1901 – 1993). Jameson used a Lafaye & Lafaye plan, and the Daniel’s moved in after it was finished. Jameson’s investment in the new neighborhood of Forest Hills drew a new family into the emerging community.

Forest Hills

Housing as Investment in Forest Hills

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10

Forest Hills

The Tiger Killer’s Home

This 1936 Tudor Revival house was built by Columbia contractor Luther E. Black for Tatum Wannamaker Gressette (1900 – 1997), a hall of fame football player for the University of South Carolina (USC) who later dedicated his life to public service. Gressette was known as the “Tiger Killer” for his surprise 25-yard-drop-kick field goal in the 1920 Carolina-Clemson rivalry game, the only points scored in that contest. The following year he again led Carolina to victory over Clemson as the captain of the team. He later served as the Citadel’s head football coach for eight seasons and as a high-school coach in Georgia. In 1940, he established the Buck A Month club, which eventually became the modern day Gamecock Club. In 1951, he was appointed as the first director of the South Carolina Retirement System.

Forest Hills

The Tiger Killer’s Home

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11

Forest Hills

A Gift by Design

This 1939 Colonial Revival house was designed by architects Lafaye & Lafaye for Marguerite Lafaye Burton (1909 – 1983), the daughter of George E. Lafaye (1878 – 1939), and her husband Calvin M. Bruton (1907 – 1956), who worked as a traveling salesman. The house features a side-gabled porch, as well as a central entrance with pilasters and molded cornice surrounding a paneled door. Marguerite’s uncle, Robert S. Lafaye (1892 – 1972), and his family lived a few blocks away at 2630 Stratford Road.


Marguerite Rayel Lafaye phtoographed on her wedding day to Calvin Michael Bruton, July 10, 1937. Reprinted from The State, July 11, 1937

Forest Hills

A Gift by Design

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12

Forest Hills

Allways

This 1937 Tudor Revival house was designed by architects Lafaye & Lafaye, a firm that won many commissions in the Forest Hills neighborhood. It was originally owned by William O. Callahan (1908 – 1967) and his wife, Phoebe Singley Callahan (1911 – 2000). Callahan graduated from the University of South Carolina and began his career as a carrier for the US Postal Service in 1935, eventually becoming Columbia’s Postmaster in 1961. He served in the United States Air Force during World War II in the European Theatre and gained the rank of Colonel.

Newspaper accounts of social events held at the house refer to it as “Allways.” The house is asymmetrical, with a rough projecting brick veneer. This home has a twin at 4111 McGregor Drive in Columbia’s Heathwood neighborhood, identical both in design and materials.

Forest Hills

Allways

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13

Forest Hills

Special Delivery

This Colonial Revival-influenced house was built in 1941 for Thomas Howard Hewitt (1911 – 1972) and his wife, Frances Furman Hewitt (1913 – 2004). Frances was a direct descendent of Reverend Richard Furman (1755 – 1825), namesake of Furman University. Thomas was the supply and equipment engineer for the South Carolina Highway Department from 1950 until his death. In 1959, the Hewitts hosted a surprise retirement party at their home for Forest Hills postman Herbert Kull. Kull described the event, attended by over one hundred people, as “the biggest surprise I’ve ever had.”

Forest Hills

Special Delivery

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14

Forest Hills

Postwar Modernism

Built in 1950 for Hamilton Osborne (1916 – 1988), president and co-owner of Tosco Industrial Supplies, and his wife, Anna Mary Shields Osborne (b. 1917), this International style house is emblematic of the new design types that emerged over the course of postwar development in Forest Hills. The neighborhood began to incorporate modern style houses in greater numbers as the movement became more prominent throughout the United States. In contrast to the revival styles that were so common in the first phase of Forest Hills development, modern houses represented a clean break with the past. This one-story house features an asymmetrical design and a low-hipped roof. Its portico has a flat roof and is supported by a wooden corner pillar.

Hamilton Osborne was a 1937 Citadel graduate who served in the United State Air Force during World War II, eventually reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel. Reprinted from The Sphinx, 1937

Forest Hills

Postwar Modernism

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15

Forest Hills

The Bagnal-Nettles Influence

This 1941 home was built by the Bagnal-Nettles Builders Supply Company for Edmund Cason Bunker, Jr. (1915 – 1999), and his wife, Katherine Gooding Bunker (1919 – 2000). The house is notable for its Art Deco-influenced shed-roof entrance. Bagnal-Nettles was prolific in Forest Hills, constructing at least thirteen houses in the neighborhood. In leading the second phase of Forest Hills’ development, the firm administered a transformation from the original naturalistic vision of the development to one more defined by the houses within it.

Edmund Bunker, pictured here with his wife, Katherine, and children, Kay and “Bitsy,” served in the United States Naval Air corps during World War II. They relocated to New York City shortly after this photograph was taken. Reprinted from The State, December 9, 1945.

Forest Hills

The Bagnal-Nettles Influence

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16

Forest Hills

An Illuminated Block

This 1954 Georgian Revival house was built by architect Howard Graham Love (1923 – 3008) for prominent attorney Julian J. Nexsen (1924 – 2015) and his wife, Mary Elizabeth “Betty” McIntosh Nexsen (1924 – 1988). In 1966, Nexsen wrangled the residents of his block into each displaying a decorated Christmas tree on their front yards. An invitation he wrote encouraged the Sheffield residents to “get lit up!” In celebration of this community beautification initiative, the Nexsens also hosted a party.

Forest Hills

An Illuminated Block

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17

Forest Hills

2804 Sheffield Road

This Neoclassical Revival house, constructed in 1941, was designed by Lafaye, Lafaye & Fair for Nebraska Edward Brown (1905 – 1984). Brown was an advertising director, sales promotion manager and member of the board of directors for the James L. Tapp Company. He was also active in civic life, serving as a national vice commander in the American Legion. The structure features a two-story, flat-roof portico supported by large brick pillars.

Forest Hills

2804 Sheffield Road

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18

Forest Hills

Charles H. Barron House

This 1937 Tudor-influenced house was first owned by Charles Henry Barron, Jr. (1909 – 1991), who was the owner and founder of Barron’s Fishing and Hunting Center. From 1942 until 1946 Barron served as the first full-time manager of the Forest Lake Club. He was active in club and church life. The asymmetrical weatherboard house has a front-gabled entrance portico and a historic one-car weatherboard garage.

Reprinted from The State, December 5, 1947

Forest Hills

Charles H. Barron House

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19

Forest Hills

The “Little Parks” of Forest Hills

Prominent landscape architect and planner Harlan Page Kelsey (1872 – 1958) designed the layout and scenery of Forest Hills for Joseph Walker (1884 – 1983), a local cotton merchant who acquired the land in 1925 and served as the neighborhood’s first developer. Kelsey was heavily invested in preserving and displaying the natural beauty of the Southeast, having been influential in the planning and creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. For the Forest Hills project, Kelsey combined his knowledge of horticulture, landscape design and residential trends such as the contemporary “City Beautiful” movement. Kelsey’s design of Forest Hills was aimed at addressing the ills of the modern world by expressing his naturalist philosophy. He created nine “little parks” spread throughout the neighborhood, ranging in size. The streets and parks of Forest Hills follow the natural topography of the land.

Forest Hills

The “Little Parks” of Forest Hills

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20

Forest Hills

James B. Urquhart House


This 1951 Colonial Revival house was the home of architect James Burwell Urquhart (1876 – 1961), and his wife Alice Childs Urquhart (1881 – 1964). Urquhart designed numerous buildings in and around the city, including the Palmetto Compress Warehouse, Richland County Court House, Manson Building and the Science Building at Benedict College. Urquhart was known especially for his school design, being the architect of dozens of schools around the state, including Columbia High School, St. Andrews High School and Booker T. Washington High School. He also designed the house at 1414 Cambridge Lane for his daughter, Alice Childs Clarke (1904 – 1982), and her husband, Rufus Clarke (1900 – 1983). The house features a projecting weatherboard entrance bay with a paneled door and transom, pedimented gable, dentil molding, pilasters and oval windows.

Forest Hills

James B. Urquhart House

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21

Forest Hills

Joseph L. Nettles House

This 1930 Craftsman-style house was designed by architects Lafaye & Lafaye for prominent Columbia attorney Joseph Lawrence Nettles (1890 – 1941) and his wife, Harriett Gillespie Nettles (1895 – 1951). The two-story house has a brick veneer first story with a stucco second story. Nettles, a South Carolina native, moved to Columbia after attaining a law degree from Harvard University. At the time of his death in 1941, he was the president of the State Bar Association.

Forest Hills

Joseph L. Nettles House

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22

Forest Hills

Brotherly Love

This 1951 Georgian Revival house was designed by architect C. Hardy Oliver (1910 – 2006) for his brother, S. Kemble Oliver, Jr. (1909 – 1988) and Kemble’s wife, Gwendolyn McKinnon Oliver (1908 – 2005). Hardy was married to Gwendolyn’s sister, Eleanor (1910 – 1993). The brothers moved to Columbia when their father, Sewall Kemble Oliver, Sr. (1884 – 1973), was appointed the manager of Columbia Duck Mill in 1909. He later founded Oliver Motor Company in 1928, which operated in Columbia for nearly 60 years.

Forest Hills

Brotherly Love

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23

Forest Hills

Cosmo L. Walker House

Built in 1932 for Cosmo L. Walker (1893 – 1958) and his wife, Julia Keenan Walker(1896 – 1972), this Tudor Revival house was designed by Greenville architect Henry R. Trott (1895 – 1937). It features a roofless terrace with a stone wall and iron railings across the front of the house. The stone for the house was locally acquired from Weston and Brooker Quarry in Cayce. Cosmo and his brother, Joseph Walker (1884 – 1983), were partners in Forest Hills Inc., the first development company in Forest Hills. A third brother, Robert B. Walker (1896 – 1977), lived next door at 1319 Devonshire Drive. The three brothers were founding partners of the cotton merchant firm Joseph Walker and Company.

Advertisement illustrating the process and priorities of Forest Hills, Inc. Reprinted from The State, February 28, 1936

Forest Hills

Cosmo L. Walker House

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24

Forest Hills

Eugene H. Salmon House

Built in 1939 for Eugene H. Salmon (1899 – 1969), this Tudor Revival house designed by Lafaye & Lafaye features a second-story gable-front box dormer with four eight-light casement windows. Salmon was stationed at Camp Jackson during World War I, where he served as news editor of the soldier’s newspaper The Jacksonian and wrote the daily column “Camp Jackson News” for The State. A gifted graphic artist, he founded the Carolina Engraving Company in 1919. He was also an active member of the First Presbyterian Church and the Lion’s Club.

Forest Hills

Eugene H. Salmon House

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25

Forest Hills

Heyward Singley House

Designed in 1950 by architect Heyward S. Singley (1902 – 1959) for his family, this house features an asymmetrical one-story entrance portico with a pedimented gable. The portico is supported by fluted pilasters and Roman Doric columns. Singley designed three houses in the Forest Hills neighborhood and was active and influential in the South Carolina architecture community. He served as chairman of the State Board of Architectural Examiners and as secretary and treasurer of the South Carolina chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Singley also designed the Columbia Central Fire Station and the Hartsville National Guard Armory.

Forest Hills

Heyward Singley House

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