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  1. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1115-1117 Woodrow Street 1115-1117 Woodrow Street
  2. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1203 Woodrow Street 1203 Woodrow Street
  3. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1209 Woodrow Street 1209 Woodrow Street
  4. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1221 Woodrow Street 1221 Woodrow Street
  5. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1306 Woodrow Street 1306 Woodrow Street
  6. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1410 Woodrow Street 1410 Woodrow Street
  7. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1501 Maple Street 1501 Maple Street
  8. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1500 Gladden Street 1500 Gladden Street
  9. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1416 Hagood Avenue 1416 Hagood Avenue
  10. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1331 Hagood Avenue 1331 Hagood Avenue
  11. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 2915 Kershaw Street 2915 Kershaw Street
  12. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1410 Shirley Street 1410 Shirley Street
  13. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1405 Shirley Street 1405 Shirley Street
  14. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1326 Shirley Street 1326 Shirley Street
  15. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1320 Shirley Street 1320 Shirley Street
  16. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1310 Shirley Street 1310 Shirley Street
  17. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1226 Daly Street 1226 Daly Street
  18. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1216 Maiden Lane 1216 Maiden Lane
  19. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1214 Daly Street 1214 Daly Street
  20. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1131 Shirley Street 1131 Shirley Street
  21. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1216 Shirley Street 1216 Shirley Street
  22. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1301 Hagood Avenue 1301 Hagood Avenue
  23. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1110 Hagood Avenue 1110 Hagood Avenue
  24. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1121 Hagood Avenue 1121 Hagood Avenue
  25. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 2806 Pickett Street 2806 Pickett Street
  26. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 2901 Bratton Street 2901 Bratton Street
  27. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1301 Gladden Street 1301 Gladden Street
  28. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1319 Gladden Street 1319 Gladden Street
  29. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1318 Maple Street 1318 Maple Street
  30. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1405-1407 Maple Street 1405-1407 Maple Street
  31. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1501-1503 Fairview Drive 1501-1503 Fairview Drive
  32. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1308 Fairview Drive 1308 Fairview Drive
  33. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1305 Fairview Drive 1305 Fairview Drive
  34. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1224 Maple Street 1224 Maple Street
  35. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1201 Maple Street 1201 Maple Street
  36. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1130 Maple Street 1130 Maple Street
  37. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1113 Fairview Drive 1113 Fairview Drive
  38. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1207 Fairview Drive 1207 Fairview Drive
  39. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1216 Fairview Drive 1216 Fairview Drive
  40. Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn 1224 Fairview Drive 1224 Fairview Drive

1

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1115-1117 Woodrow Street

New construction in architectural conservation districts attempts to fit into the visual rhythm of historic neighboring properties.  Contemporary interpretations of historic elements and the use of modern building materials set these houses apart from their early 20th-century neighbors.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1115-1117 Woodrow Street

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2

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1203 Woodrow Street

Built about 1915, this wood frame structure has decorative, exposed rafter tails found on both its porch’s hipped roof and on its primary roof that speak to the tenets of the popular Craftsman style, which celebrated structural components and construction materials within buildings.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1203 Woodrow Street

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3

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1209 Woodrow Street

This bungalow has many Craftsman style features, such as detailed porch railings and columns and a façade-width porch with wide overhanging eaves.  Smaller elements include a nine-light Prairie style front door and exposed rafter tails.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1209 Woodrow Street

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4

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1221 Woodrow Street

Craftsman bungalows tend to be one to one-and-one-half story houses dominated by low pitched roofs and façade-width or L-shaped porches.  Detailed columns on brick piers and louvered attic vents beneath gables are other common elements of the bungalow.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1221 Woodrow Street

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5

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1306 Woodrow Street

Built about 1930, this Craftsman style bungalow features an asymmetrical cross-gabled configuration and grouped, square columns reminiscent of the Colonial Revival style.  The building’s unique windows combine an upper sash comprised of a multi-pane diamond motif with a single pane lower sash.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1306 Woodrow Street

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6

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1410 Woodrow Street

Kit homes became a popular trend in affordable residential building that encouraged home ownership in the late 1910s.  The Common Brick Manufacturers Association of America heralded this bungalow, known as the “Swanee,” as one of its “Homes of Lasting Charm.”

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1410 Woodrow Street

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7

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1501 Maple Street

Popular in the United States from 1880 through 1940, Colonial Revival architecture celebrates the simplicity of Georgian and Federal style structures of the 18th and early 19th centuries.  This masonry veneered residence mimics the balance and symmetry of homes built generations earlier.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1501 Maple Street

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8

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1500 Gladden Street

Embodying the Tudor, this Revival style cottage incorporates a number of elements, such as a steeply pitched roof and faux half timbering, inspired by medieval English architecture.  After masonry veneering became widespread in the 1920s, brick became the preferred wall finish for such cottages.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1500 Gladden Street

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9

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1416 Hagood Avenue

A Colonial Revival-inspired porch featuring a pediment supported by Doric columns accentuates this circa-1935 cottage’s front stoop.  The Classical style of the stoop contrasts sharply with the medieval-inspired details of half timbering and stucco found within the building’s gables.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1416 Hagood Avenue

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10

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1331 Hagood Avenue

One of the oldest houses within Melrose Heights, this circa-1904 property is best characterized as an American Foursquare featuring minor Colonial Revival elements such as a partial wrap-around front porch and a hipped roofline from which matching chimneys project.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1331 Hagood Avenue

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11

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

2915 Kershaw Street

Built about 1935, this residence strikes a balance between the Craftsman and Tudor Revival styles. A deep front porch and cross-gabled roofline blend well with the stucco and half-timbered gables and bracketed soffit, resulting in one of the neighborhood’s more recognizable bungalows.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

2915 Kershaw Street

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12

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1410 Shirley Street

As a testament to their success and aspirations, members of the Powell family erected a new home in 1917.  Columbia’s purest example of Prairie style architecture, this landmark features a low-pitched, hipped roof with broad overhanging eaves and elongated one-over-one paned windows.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1410 Shirley Street

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13

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1405 Shirley Street

This property’s architectural distinction led it to be included as one of six residences featured on the Melrose Heights Company stationery, which promoted the neighborhood’s development during the 1930s.  The house’s long roofline creates the sense of a triangle, a feeling reinforced by a louvered attic vent of the same form.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1405 Shirley Street

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14

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1326 Shirley Street

Considered to be one of the neighborhood’s earliest homes, this imposing corner property features an asymmetrical façade and a porte cochere, which offered passengers some shelter when entering or exiting vehicles.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1326 Shirley Street

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15

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1320 Shirley Street

Melrose Heights contains several formerly single family homes converted into multiple residences.  However, this former duplex was rehabilitated into a single-family house that benefits from the building’s dynamic, asymmetrical front façade.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1320 Shirley Street

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16

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1310 Shirley Street

This bungalow’s principal features include a deep façade-width porch without railings and a porte cochere, common design elements that visually tie the building to its surrounding yard.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1310 Shirley Street

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17

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1226 Daly Street

A dominant design feature of this asymmetrical residence is the L-shaped porch that engages both the building’s principal and secondary street elevations.   Low-pitched projecting gables with exposed rafter tails are supported by trapezoidal tapered columns, elements often found in bungalows.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1226 Daly Street

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18

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1216 Maiden Lane

This bungalow is believed to date to the early 1900s, well before many of the neighborhood’s other houses.  The porch columns’ and railings’ slim and delicate details are reminiscent of Victorian features, quite unlike the bulky and heavy elements typical of the later Craftsman style.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1216 Maiden Lane

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19

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1214 Daly Street

Craftsman architecture was a reaction against the excessive detailing found in late Victorian design.  Rustic and simple, this new expression celebrated the beauty and texture of building materials.  Occasionally, Craftsman style homes featured paint schemes of multiple, earth-tone colors.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1214 Daly Street

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20

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1131 Shirley Street

Riding the wave of modern technology was a host of new housing forms erected throughout America’s suburbs.  The “foursquare” form of residential architecture became popular among the middleclass for its size and layout.  This pyramidal roofed, cast concrete block structure features an L-shaped porch and asymmetrical façade.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1131 Shirley Street

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21

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1216 Shirley Street

This Craftsman style bungalow features a gabled front and a paint scheme appropriate to the 1920s-1930s.  Other typical features include a low pitched roof, exposed rafter tails that run the length of the house, and five decorative brackets on the front façade’s gable.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1216 Shirley Street

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22

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1301 Hagood Avenue

This unusual bungalow features a pyramidal roof with an eyebrow-shaped curve over its central bay, which is flanked by two front porches and entrances.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1301 Hagood Avenue

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23

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1110 Hagood Avenue

This circa-1910 “kit” cottage was marketed by both Aladdin Homes and Lewis Homes.  At least two more examples of this plan are located within the Shandon and Hollywood-Rose Hill neighborhoods, emphasizing the popularity of kit homes during Columbia’s early suburbanization.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1110 Hagood Avenue

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24

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1121 Hagood Avenue

Modest in size, this circa-1910 wood frame house features a pyramidal roof with a central chimney.  Though neighboring residences built about the same time have exposed rafter tails, this example has an enclosed soffit and plain frieze board embellishing its roofline.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1121 Hagood Avenue

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25

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

2806 Pickett Street

The wide archway that frames this bungalow’s shallow porch also marks its central entrance.  Oversized knee braces support the gabled arch’s wide eaves, while the building’s low-pitched roof and exposed rafter tails represent further hallmarks of the bungalow form.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

2806 Pickett Street

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26

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

2901 Bratton Street

Occasionally builders used rusticated cast concrete blocks within early 20th-century houses, as seen here within the chimney, column piers, and foundation of one of the neighborhood’s earliest residences.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

2901 Bratton Street

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27

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1301 Gladden Street

Originally, Melrose Heights featured greater numbers of houses in which yellow brick highlighted corners, doorways, and windows of red brick facades.  This practice mimicked more expensive houses that combined masonry with granite detailing.  The prevalence of local brick made this treatment a logical alternative for developers, who appeared to have borrowed design ideas from kit home catalogues.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1301 Gladden Street

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28

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1319 Gladden Street

This circa-1925 house may have been inspired by the “Lakeside” kit home offered by Radford Homes that year.  Unlike the kit home, however, this property features Neoclassical-inspired fanlights that embellish doorways with different layouts.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1319 Gladden Street

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29

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1318 Maple Street

“Airplane bungalows,” feature a distinctive partial second story or “cockpit,” that projects above the “wings” of its roof.  Often containing a sleeping porch or bedrooms, this area afforded homeowners a panoramic view through multiple banks of windows.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1318 Maple Street

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30

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1405-1407 Maple Street

With its diamond-pattern-over-one window sashes and half-timbering evoking a sense of “Old World” architecture, this revival style cottage is one of the many duplexes built within the neighborhood during the 1920s through 1940s.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1405-1407 Maple Street

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31

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1501-1503 Fairview Drive

This circa-1937 dual family residence blends characteristics found within both the cottage and minimal traditional house forms. While featuring the high pitched roof common in cottages, this duplex has a shallow, boxed overhang typical of the later, less detailed “min trad” form.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1501-1503 Fairview Drive

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32

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1308 Fairview Drive

The use of a central gable, clad in a brick diaper pattern and flanked by lesser, side gables featuring decorative half-timbering, results in a heightened sense of verticality for this distinctive revival style cottage.  Slate shingles and tall, narrow, diamond-patterned windows set this house further apart from neighboring residences.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1308 Fairview Drive

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33

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1305 Fairview Drive

While retaining its most important architectural detail – the eclectic combination of rough, light gray stone set within a red brick façade – this revival style cottage has lost its original slate roof and its formerly exposed rafter tails have been enclosed by siding.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1305 Fairview Drive

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34

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1224 Maple Street

Architectural details, such as stone, stucco, and slate, and the incorporation of a semi-cantilevered second-story bay grant this cottage a feeling of medieval architecture.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1224 Maple Street

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35

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1201 Maple Street

Built about 1940, this one and one-half-story residence possesses many characteristics commonly found within cottages, such as an irregular layout, brick veneer with decorative detailing, a side porch, and a roof with multiple-cross-gables that create dynamic elevations.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1201 Maple Street

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36

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1130 Maple Street

An outgrowth of the Prairie style of architecture that arose during the early 1900s in the Midwest, the American Foursquare derived its name from its cube-like shape.  One of the neighborhood’s earlier houses, this property dates to about 1909 and possesses Craftsman traits.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1130 Maple Street

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37

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1113 Fairview Drive

This 1920s-era house originally was a purer example of the Mission style, an architectural expression popular from 1890 through 1920.  Within the center of its asymmetrical façade once stood a two-story, tower-like projection that terminated in an archway.  Despite a modern hipped roof, the “ghost” of the home’s original Spanish-tiled, irregular roofline remains visible on the chimney.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1113 Fairview Drive

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38

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1207 Fairview Drive

The 1929 Sears catalogue of Honor Bilt Homes promoted a dynamic kit house known as “The Mansfield.”  Differences between the Mansfield’s gabled entrance and window placement and those of this 1930s-era cottage imply that a local builder may have used the Sears product as a general model for construction.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1207 Fairview Drive

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39

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1216 Fairview Drive

This two and one-half story cottage, believed to date to the 1920s, features a handful of interesting design elements including a rusticated stone entrance and a dramatic roofline whose long, flared eaves visually tie the building to the landscape.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1216 Fairview Drive

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40

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1224 Fairview Drive

Noteworthy among neighboring houses of architectural distinction, this 1930s-era house embodies the tenets of the Dutch Colonial Revival style, whose most obvious design element is a gambrel or barn-like roofline.

Melrose Heights/Oak Lawn

1224 Fairview Drive

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