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  1. Robert Mills District East Robert Mills House 1616 Blanding Street
  2. Robert Mills District East The Township Auditorium 1703 Taylor Street
  3. Robert Mills District East Hampton-Preston Mansion 1615 Blanding Street
  4. Robert Mills District East Site of Former Hurleyville Community 1700 Block Henderson Street – East Side
  5. Robert Mills District East 1826 Henderson Street 1826 Henderson Street
  6. Robert Mills District East 1830 Henderson Street 1830 Henderson Street
  7. Robert Mills District East 1900 Block of Henderson Street 1900 Block of Henderson Street
  8. Robert Mills District East 1631 Richland Street 1631 Richland Street
  9. Robert Mills District East 1600 Block of Richland Street – North Side 1600 Block of Richland Street – North Side
  10. Robert Mills District East Site of former Columbia Male Academy and Taylor School 1616 Richland Street
  11. Robert Mills District East The Seibels House 1601 Richland Street
  12. Robert Mills District East Residential sites and Seibels Dependencies 1900 Block of Pickens Street East Side
  13. Robert Mills District East South Carolina Asylum North Side of Calhoun Street 1500 Block
  14. Robert Mills District East Barton-Wallace House 1500 Calhoun Street
  15. Robert Mills District East 1516 Calhoun Street 1516 Calhoun Street
  16. Robert Mills District East 1900 Block of Pickens Street - West Side 1900 Block of Pickens Street West Side
  17. Robert Mills District East 1500 Block of Richland Street - North Side 1500 Block of Richland Street North Side
  18. Robert Mills District East 1507 Richland Street 1507 Richland Street
  19. Robert Mills District East Wade-Campbell-Wright House 1501 Richland Street
  20. Robert Mills District East Site of former Duffie-Verner House 1502 Richland Street
  21. Robert Mills District East 1516 Richland Street 1516 Richland Street
  22. Robert Mills District East Maxcy Gregg House 1518 Richland Street
  23. Robert Mills District East South Carolina Chapter of A.I.A., Clemson Architectural Foundation 1522 Richland Street
  24. Robert Mills District East Jack Davis House 1526 Richland Street
  25. Robert Mills District East Davis House 1530 Richland Street
  26. Robert Mills District East 1800 Block of Pickens Street - West Side 1800 Block of Pickens Street West Side
  27. Robert Mills District East 1531 Laurel Street 1531 Laurel Street
  28. Robert Mills District East Boozer-Crumpler House 1529 Laurel Street
  29. Robert Mills District East 1521 Laurel Street 1521 Laurel Street
  30. Robert Mills District East 1517 Laurel Street 1517 Laurel Street
  31. Robert Mills District East Sims-Stackhouse Mansion 1511 Laurel Street
  32. Robert Mills District East Former site of 1501 Laurel Street 1501 Laurel Street
  33. Robert Mills District East Former site of F.A. Tradewell House 1500 Laurel Street
  34. Robert Mills District East 1508 Laurel Street 1508 Laurel Street
  35. Robert Mills District East Lachicotte House 1512 Laurel Street
  36. Robert Mills District East 1700 Block of Pickens Street West Side 1700 Block of Pickens Street West Side
  37. Robert Mills District East Howe House 1531 Blanding Street
  38. Robert Mills District East 1517 and 1527 Blanding Street 1517 and 1527 Blanding Street
  39. Robert Mills District East Former Site of N.G. Gonzales House 1505 Blanding Street
  40. Robert Mills District East Crawford-Clarkson House 1502 Blanding Street
  41. Robert Mills District East Good Shepherd Episcopal Church 1512 Blanding Street
  42. Robert Mills District East 1528 and 1534 Blanding Street 1528 and 1534 Blanding Street
  43. Robert Mills District East 1600 Block of Pickens Street - West Side 1600 Block of Pickens Street West Side
  44. Robert Mills District East Leevy’s Funeral Home 1831 Taylor Street
  45. Robert Mills District East Columbia Fire Department Museum 1800 Laurel Street
  46. Robert Mills District East 1928 Barnwell Street 1928 Barnwell Street

1

Robert Mills District East

Robert Mills House

Built between 1823 and 1825, the Robert Mills House is named for its designer, a native Charlestonian who became the nation’s first federal architect.  Though intended as a fashionable private home for English merchant Ainsley Hall and his lower Richland County wife, Sarah, the early 19th-century mansion historically served only institutional purposes.  Depicted in a 1908 postcard, the Hall’s mansion was the centerpiece of the Columbia Theological Seminary. 

Robert Mills District East

Robert Mills House

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2

Robert Mills District East

The Township Auditorium

Erected in 1929, this Works Progress Administration (WPA) era structure was designed by the renowned Columbia architectural firm of Lafaye, Lafaye and Associates. For generations this local landmark has been the venue for a variety of public events. Shortly after its construction, the Township became a celebrated landmark as this 1940s era postcard attests.

Robert Mills District East

The Township Auditorium

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3

Robert Mills District East

Hampton-Preston Mansion

Built in 1818, this mansion and the many buildings that once stood here were home to many people – wealthy antebellum planters and enslaved workers, a Reconstruction-era governor, over a generation of college women, and renters.  Best known for its association with Columbia’s powerful Hampton and Preston families, this property once featured nationally recognized gardens.  Union forces occupied the mansion in February 1865 as depicted by Harper’s Weekly.

Robert Mills District East

Hampton-Preston Mansion

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4

Robert Mills District East

Site of Former Hurleyville Community

C. Drie, Bird’s Eye View of the City of Columbia, South Carolina, 1872, Courtesy of Library of Congress

Following the Civil War, northerner Timothy Hurley established a community of thirty-two homes for Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad Company employees on this city block that was once owned by the Hampton and Preston families.  The former compact community is easily discernable on C. Drie’s 1872 bird’s eye map of Columbia. Due to late 20th-century development all traces of the neighborhood have been erased.

Robert Mills District East

Site of Former Hurleyville Community

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5

Robert Mills District East

1826 Henderson Street

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Built between 1884 and 1894, this Carpenter Gothic, or Stick Style, building was one of two identically sized structures erected by Susan Johnson, daughter of local builder Robert W. Johnson, who constructed Woodrow Wilson’s family home on Hampton Street in 1872.  Since 1967, this former residence has served as headquarters for the South Carolina Parent/Teacher Association.

Robert Mills District East

1826 Henderson Street

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6

Robert Mills District East

1830 Henderson Street

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Captain David S. and Annie Emiline Friday boarded Charleston refugees at this Columbia Cottage style home from 1864-1865 during the Civil War. Purportedly, a sick northern officer recently freed from Camp Asylum sought refuge here and spared the property from destruction by Union forces in February 1865.

Robert Mills District East

1830 Henderson Street

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7

Robert Mills District East

1900 Block of Henderson Street

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

The district’s densest remaining residential section, this block historically was home to African Americans, many of whom worked at the State Asylum north of Calhoun Street.  House styles range from late 19th-century cottages (1930 Henderson) to 1920s-era cottages (1915 Henderson) and bungalows (1920 Henderson).  Several homes on the street’s east side feature deep lots and a once common feature on many parcels were secondary dwellings (illustrated in the Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of 1919), the last of which was demolished around 2004.

Robert Mills District East

1900 Block of Henderson Street

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8

Robert Mills District East

1631 Richland Street

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

A 1995 recipient of Historic Columbia Foundation’s preservation award, this circa-1918 residence embodies the tenets of the American Foursquare design, popular in the United States during the 1910s through 1920s.  From 1903-1905, seamstress Amanda Green, who married into Columbia’s Mann-Simons family, lived here in an earlier house that once stood on this site.

Robert Mills District East

1631 Richland Street

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9

Robert Mills District East

1600 Block of Richland Street – North Side

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

During the late 19th century this portion of Richland Street featured more homes.  Until the 1910s, four buildings of equal size, of which 1623 is the last remaining, stood on the eastern half of the block’s north side.  Initially built as a single-family home sometime during the 1910s, 1627 Richland Street was converted into a duplex at unknown time.  Between 1883 and 1895, Edwin G. Seibels, co-founder of the Seibels-Bruce Insurance Company, erected, 1613 Richland Street, a two-story residence and auto garage (depicted in the 1919 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map).  During the 1920s, the family demolished this building (outlined in red) to expand the gardens surrounding their earlier home, then listed as 1603 Richland Street.

Robert Mills District East

1600 Block of Richland Street – North Side

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10

Robert Mills District East

Site of former Columbia Male Academy and Taylor School

Since 1827, this four-acre tract has served educational uses.  From 1829 until 1905, the Columbia Male Academy operated in a building similar in style to that of the Robert Mills House.

Taylor Elementary School stood here from 1905 until 1966, only to be razed for construction of the current administrative building. Early 20th-century postcards depict the former buildings that once graced the block.

Robert Mills District East

Site of former Columbia Male Academy and Taylor School

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11

Robert Mills District East

The Seibels House

Purportedly the oldest remaining building in Columbia, a portion of the Seibels House is believed to date to 1796. Various owners adapted the house to meet their needs, especially the Seibels family, which acquired the property in 1858. The building’s Colonial Revival style dates to a 1920s renovation designed by architect J. Carroll Johnson. Historic Columbia Foundation received the property as a gift in 1988 and uses the building for its administrative headquarters and as a rental property.

Robert Mills District East

The Seibels House

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12

Robert Mills District East

Residential sites and Seibels Dependencies

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Several late 19th-century cottages (outlined in red) once lined this side of Pickens Street, in addition to the Seibels property’s dependencies.  The kitchen house remained in use until the 1950s as the family’s cook preferred the its wood burning stove to the modern electric stove located within the main house.

Robert Mills District East

Residential sites and Seibels Dependencies

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13

Robert Mills District East

South Carolina Asylum

Designed by Robert Mills in 1822 and opened in 1828, this sprawling facility was heralded for its modern, humane approach to treating mental health patients. Equipped with heating and ventilating systems and oriented so that its dormitory rooms received maximum sunlight, the Asylum today remains as one of the city’s most recognizable landmarks.

Robert Mills District East

South Carolina Asylum

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14

Robert Mills District East

Barton-Wallace House

Formerly located in the 1500 block of Elmwood Avenue, this circa-1840 structure was erected by Colonel William Wallace as a gift to his daughter and her husband Dr. Edward Barton, noted for his work in combating yellow fever.

Robert Mills District East

Barton-Wallace House

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15

Robert Mills District East

1516 Calhoun Street

The recipient of a 2008 Historic Columbia Foundation preservation award, this Arts and Crafts style-inspired office building serves as a fine example of infill construction that adds to its historic antecedents found within the district.

Robert Mills District East

1516 Calhoun Street

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16

Robert Mills District East

1900 Block of Pickens Street - West Side

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Great change occurred to this portion of Pickens Street after 1920 with many earlier homes demolished (outlined in red) to make way for fashionable bungalows in the 1930s. Only late 19th-century cottages at 1921 and 1923 Pickens remain. In 1984, the circa-1880 former residence at 1921 Pickens was relocated from 1316 Blanding Street.

Robert Mills District East

1900 Block of Pickens Street - West Side

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17

Robert Mills District East

1500 Block of Richland Street - North Side

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Except for the two-story former store at 1531 (outlined in red), all remaining structures were homes until the 1970s, when greater numbers of businesses began to move into the district. The cottage resting at 1523 and the Queen Anne home at 1511 are the only 19th-century buildings left on the street’s eastern portion. A circa-1925 cottage and a circa-1927 bungalow replaced an earlier home that once stood at 1527 and modern infill at 1515 and 1523 Pickens Street replaced the historic homes that once stood at those locations.

Robert Mills District East

1500 Block of Richland Street - North Side

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18

Robert Mills District East

1507 Richland Street

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

This circa-1900 Neoclassical cottage’s style is a response to the asymmetry and excessive ornamentation of the preceding Queen Anne style.  Though more modest in embellishment, this former home nonetheless features architecturally interesting aspects such as a three-bay wide front porch with a Chinese-Chippendale latticework balustrade and French doors.  By 1980, interior designer Andrew Kerns turned the home into a show house by 1980; later it served as a law office.

Robert Mills District East

1507 Richland Street

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19

Robert Mills District East

Wade-Campbell-Wright House

C. Drie, Bird’s Eye View of the City of Columbia, South Carolina, 1872, Courtesy of Library of Congress

The earliest visual reference to a property resting at this site is from C. Drie’s 1872 Birdseye Map of Columbia, shown here.  However, most written references place the building’s construction at 1912.  If today’s structure is that illustrated here then the building has had its windows and front porch modified during the early 20th-century.

Robert Mills District East

Wade-Campbell-Wright House

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20

Robert Mills District East

Site of former Duffie-Verner House

Image courtesy The R. L. Bryan Company

On this site once stood a circa-1819 two-story wood frame mansion with a raised basement.  Federal in style, this structure would have been a contemporary of the Hampton-Preston Mansion, erected one year earlier.  The property, once owned by bookseller and publisher W.J. Duffie, was demolished in 1972 to make way for commercial development.  The current office building may have drawn its architectural inspiration from the Hampton-Preston Mansion.

Robert Mills District East

Site of former Duffie-Verner House

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21

Robert Mills District East

1516 Richland Street

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

This Neoclassical structure, built about 1912, evokes the grandeur of antebellum mansions with its massive Corinthian columns, decorative swags, and dentil moldings.  Early 20th-century features, such as one-over one paned windows and a porte-cochere for cars, reveal its true date of construction.

Robert Mills District East

1516 Richland Street

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22

Robert Mills District East

Maxcy Gregg House

Recognized for its association with Confederate General Maxcy Gregg, who purchased it in 1854, the property initially belonged to John Davis, who had it built by June 1841.  The Land family bought the home in 1880 and incorporated a formerly separate kitchen into an addition at the rear of the house and added three dormers and a broadened, columned porch to give the structure a “Barbados flavor.”  After ninety-two years as a home, the building was adaptively reused as offices in 1974 by architect Bill Fulmer.

Robert Mills District East

Maxcy Gregg House

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23

Robert Mills District East

South Carolina Chapter of A.I.A., Clemson Architectural Foundation

This Victorian cottage was built about 1880 in the popular Queen Anne style featured prominently in American home design from 1870 to 1900.  Most notable is the stick work balustrade and a lattice frieze supported by the turned posts of the front porch.  The Clemson Architectural Foundation, the S.C. Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, and Wilson Tate Architects purchased and restored the house in 1995 soon after it was slated for demolition.

Robert Mills District East

South Carolina Chapter of A.I.A., Clemson Architectural Foundation

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24

Robert Mills District East

Jack Davis House

Built about 1894, this property remained in the Davis family as a private residence until the early 21st century.  As with other Queen Anne style houses found within the district, this former home incorporates architectural details such as decorative scroll work porch brackets and multiple gables.

Robert Mills District East

Jack Davis House

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25

Robert Mills District East

Davis House

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Edmund P. Davis erected this Columbia Cottage style home in the 1880s after the original home burned in 1868.  In 1925, the home was updated with dormers and a remodeled front porch.  Like other former homes in the historic district, this property has been adaptively reused for commercial purposes.

Robert Mills District East

Davis House

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26

Robert Mills District East

1800 Block of Pickens Street - West Side

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Only two buildings were demolished (outlined in red) and one was built on this portion of Pickens Street since 1919, when the Sanborn Fire Insurance Company issued this map.  Converted at some point into a quadplex, the circa-1915 gable-front structure standing at 1815 Pickens speaks to the mid-20th century trend of formerly single family, owner occupied homes being partitioned into rental apartments.

Robert Mills District East

1800 Block of Pickens Street - West Side

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27

Robert Mills District East

1531 Laurel Street

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Built about 1915, this adaptively reused, former home features details such as a clipped gable, (or jerkin head) roofline and faux half-timbering typical within the Tudor Revival expression of the early 20th century’s Period Revival architectural movement. The home once featured a façade-width, single-story front porch, as shown on the Sanborn fire insurance map of 1919.

Robert Mills District East

1531 Laurel Street

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28

Robert Mills District East

Boozer-Crumpler House

Drawing inspiration from 19th-century Classic Revival and Greek Revival architecture, this temple-like mansion embodies popular, early 20th century Neoclassical style design.  Though fashionable in 1912 when dentist and real estate speculator J.W. Boozer and his wife Mary built it, like many larger homes in the district, the building was enlarged and partitioned into apartments decades later.  Since the family sold the property in 1977, the structure has been put to commercial uses.

Robert Mills District East

Boozer-Crumpler House

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29

Robert Mills District East

1521 Laurel Street

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Edgar O. Black, president of the Equitable Building and Loan Company, had this Neoclassical mansion constructed in 1912.  Black used the basement to run a one-man bank and he later subdivided much of the home into apartments.  Purchasing the house from the family in 1999, owners Ted and Danielle Deary, who also run their offices here, later received an Historic Columbia Foundation preservation award for adaptive reuse.

Robert Mills District East

1521 Laurel Street

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30

Robert Mills District East

1517 Laurel Street

Image courtesy Columbia Housing Authority

Post-1969 modifications have altered the original appearance of this circa-1925, Colonial Revival style, former home considerably.  Once, the building’s facade was more visually complex, featuring a one-story porch, dormer, and a small window on its second story.  The pedimented architrave above its front door is a later addition.

Robert Mills District East

1517 Laurel Street

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31

Robert Mills District East

Sims-Stackhouse Mansion

Built before 1853 by the Sims family, this imposing mansion once sat within the middle of the block and looked rather different.  In 1909, Columbia banker T.B. Stackhouse bought the property and removed the top floors from atop the home’s raised basement and relocated them one parcel west.  The South Carolina Federation of Women’s Club has maintained its state headquarters here since 1934 when Stackhouse bequeathed the home to the City of Columbia. 

Robert Mills District East

Sims-Stackhouse Mansion

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32

Robert Mills District East

Former site of 1501 Laurel Street

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

On this parcel once stood an Italianate home built between 1872 and 1883, based on maps from those years.  Similar in detail to the Woodrow Wilson family home, this structure was indicative of building styles that were popular immediately following the Civil War. Like other properties within the district, it was razed for commercial development in the 1970s.

Robert Mills District East

Former site of 1501 Laurel Street

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33

Robert Mills District East

Former site of F.A. Tradewell House

Image courtesy The R. L. Bryan Company

Another of the district’s grand antebellum mansions stood at this site until the last half of the 20th century.  A wood frame, two-story, circa-1840 structure on a raised basement, this Classical Revival Italianate building once was home to F.A. Tradewell, a bookkeeper who was associated with the site from the 1850s until after the Civil War.

Robert Mills District East

Former site of F.A. Tradewell House

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34

Robert Mills District East

1508 Laurel Street

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Completed about 1900, this Queen Anne style house features the multiple gables, wrap-around porch, and decorative elements expected in residences within that architectural movement.  This form of home proved popular for turn-of-the-century Columbians of means living within the city’s original downtown and in its early suburbs.

Robert Mills District East

1508 Laurel Street

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35

Robert Mills District East

Lachicotte House

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Charlestonian Philip Howard Lachicotte relocated to Columbia in 1883 and established a successful jewelry store on Richardson (Main) Street.  His success allowed for the construction of this Queen Anne style home in 1897.  Unique to the asymmetrical building is the Chippendale style gingerbread balustrade that highlights its porch.  The property remained in his family until 1978, when it was adaptively reused for offices.

Robert Mills District East

Lachicotte House

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36

Robert Mills District East

1700 Block of Pickens Street West Side

1919 Sanborn Fire Insurance Company map excerpt courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Only two turn-of-the-19th-century houses recall the former residential nature of this portion of Pickens Street.  A rarity in the district, though found occasionally in some of Columbia’s older neighborhoods, is the molded concrete block construction of 1715 Pickens Street, which was erected in 1905.  The two-story wood frame neighbor to the south, at 1711 Pickens, was erected about that same year.  Clad in brick veneer during the 1950s, the building was returned to its original appearance in 1982.  Where the parking lot now rests, once stood 1717 and 1721 Pickens Street (outlined in red and shown in 1968).

Image courtesy Columbia Housing Authority

Robert Mills District East

1700 Block of Pickens Street West Side

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37

Robert Mills District East

Howe House

Image courtesy South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina 

This circa-1830, Federal Style home belonged to Dr. George Howe, who served on the faculty of Columbia Theological Seminary for fifty-two years until his death in 1883.  John B. Jackson noted the Howe family’s plot on his circa-1850 map of Columbia.  The property later passed to George Howe, Jr., husband of Annie Josephine Wilson, a sister of President Woodrow Wilson.  In 1904, the Black-Stokes family bought the home and remained there for fifty-one years.  By the 1970s, the property was divided into several apartments.  In 1979, the building was condemned after a substantial fire.  The building was renovated for offices in 1981.

Robert Mills District East

Howe House

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38

Robert Mills District East

1517 and 1527 Blanding Street

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Post-Civil War cottages once stood where the American Four-Square property at 1527 Blanding and the Queen Anne style house at 1517 Blanding Street now rest.

Robert Mills District East

1517 and 1527 Blanding Street

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39

Robert Mills District East

Former Site of N.G. Gonzales House

Image courtesy The R.L Bryan Company

An asymmetrical, two-story wood frame mansion built sometime between 1872 and 1883 once stood at this address.  N.G. Gonzales, the first editor of The State newspaper, once lived here, as did members of the McCreery family.  Afterwards, the home served as a YWCA until it was demolished to make way for the present building.

Robert Mills District East

Former Site of N.G. Gonzales House

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40

Robert Mills District East

Crawford-Clarkson House

1872 bird’s eye map excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress

Situated on the southeast corner of Blanding and Bull streets, this circa-1837 house was built for Columbia banker John A. Crawford.  According to family tradition, a portion of an earlier barn may lie within its framework.  Impressive gardens once graced the property, which prior to 1872, stretched south to Taylor Street.

Robert Mills District East

Crawford-Clarkson House

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41

Robert Mills District East

Good Shepherd Episcopal Church

1919 Sanborn Fire Insurance Company map excerpt courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

Erected in 1901 by a congregation that formed in 1883 and initially met on Barnwell Street, the Church of the Good Shepherd is a Gothic Revival style sanctuary executed in a cruciform shape. The circa-1893 memorial stained glass window above the altar was moved from the original Barnwell Street church.  Beneath the building’s front steps, visible from an inside trapdoor, rests the cornerstone of Christ Episcopal Church (1858-1865), which once stood one block west until its destruction during the Civil War.  Post-1898 homes that bordered the church immediately to its east and west were demolished to enlarge the institution’s campus.

Robert Mills District East

Good Shepherd Episcopal Church

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42

Robert Mills District East

1528 and 1534 Blanding Street

1872 bird’s eye map excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress

This parcel of land has been the site of many different homes.  C. R. Bryce’s antebellum mansion (outlined in red), used briefly by Woodrow Wilson’s family from 1870-1871, was replaced by the Thomas Hair House, which was destroyed by fire in the 1970s.

In 1980, the circa-1875 Heiss-Meehan-Guignard House at 1534 (formerly 1416 Hampton Street) and the circa-1885 Bond House at 1528 were relocated to this site as historic infill redevelopment.

Robert Mills District East

1528 and 1534 Blanding Street

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43

Robert Mills District East

1600 Block of Pickens Street - West Side

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

No development independent of properties fronting Blanding or Taylor streets occurred in this section of the block until the 1930s.  The two-story masonry duplex at 1621-1623 is emblematic of 1930s-era housing stock, featuring details such as multiple arches and stone embellishments.  The commercial structure at 1615 is representative of non-contributing commercial infill that occurred in the 1970s-1980s.

Robert Mills District East

1600 Block of Pickens Street - West Side

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44

Robert Mills District East

Leevy’s Funeral Home

Entrepreneur Isaac Samuel “I.S.” Leevy escaped poverty to become one of the most prominent and influential African-American business leaders of Richland County in the early 20th-century.  In 1932, Leevy established the first black-owned service station in the city; this property came to house his family’s funeral home, which is in its third generation of family ownership.

Robert Mills District East

Leevy’s Funeral Home

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45

Robert Mills District East

Columbia Fire Department Museum

Historic buildings and their inhabitants within the Robert Mills District enjoy vigilant protection from a watchful neighbor - the Columbia Fire Department. Citizens and visitors to Columbia can learn about the evolution of fire protection services within the capital city of South Carolina in a setting that includes a large array of memorabilia, equipment, and historic photographs.

Robert Mills District East

Columbia Fire Department Museum

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46

Robert Mills District East

1928 Barnwell Street

1872 bird’s eye map excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress

One of the earlier buildings remaining within the original city limits, this structure appears to date to the early 19th century, based on its architectural style.  Even by the 1870s, the property remained in a fairly undeveloped area of town as C. Drie illustrated in his Birdseye Map of the city in1872.  The structure was recently clad in vinyl siding and received replacement windows.

Robert Mills District East

1928 Barnwell Street

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