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  1. University Hill Rutledge College The Horseshoe
  2. University Hill Former Site of President's House University of South Carolina Horseshoe
  3. University Hill Maxcy Monument University of South Carolina Horseshoe
  4. University Hill McCutchen House University of South Carolina Horseshoe
  5. University Hill South Caroliniana Library University of South Carolina Horseshoe
  6. University Hill Longstreet Theatre 1300 Greene Street
  7. University Hill The World War Memorial Corner of Sumter and Pendleton streets
  8. University Hill Town Theatre 1012 Sumter Street
  9. University Hill Gonzales Monument Intersection of Senate and Sumter streets
  10. University Hill Trinity Episcopal Cathedral 1100 Sumter Street
  11. University Hill Site of Maxcy Family Home 1310 Senate Street
  12. University Hill Claire Towers 1041 Marion Street
  13. University Hill Senate Club 1018 Marion Street
  14. University Hill McCord House 1431 Pendleton Street
  15. University Hill Thomas Taylor House 1501 Senate Street
  16. University Hill Site of Former Residence of George L. Baker 1429 Senate Street
  17. University Hill WIS Television 1111 Bull Street
  18. University Hill Horry-Guignard House 1527 Senate Street
  19. University Hill McMaster School 1106 Pickens Street
  20. University Hill Cain-Matthews-Tompkins House 1619 Pendleton Street
  21. University Hill Kirkland Apartments 1611 Pendleton Street
  22. University Hill Columbia Cottage 1707 Pendleton Street
  23. University Hill Scott House 1006 Barnwell Street
  24. University Hill Site of the Last Home of General Wade Hampton III 1800 Senate Street
  25. University Hill William Sloan House 1731 Senate Street
  26. University Hill Weston-Edmunds-Verner House 1808 Senate Street
  27. University Hill Robert Moorman House 1830 Senate Street
  28. University Hill An American Foursquare 1015 Laurens Street
  29. University Hill Waring-Crosswell-McMeekin House 1915 Pendleton Street
  30. University Hill A. S. Salley House 901 Laurens Street
  31. University Hill Charleston Single-House 1938 College Street
  32. University Hill Boyne-Pressley-Spigner House 915 Gregg Street
  33. University Hill An Architect Designed Home 15 Gibbes Court
  34. University Hill Haltiwanger House 12 Gibbes Court
  35. University Hill Capstone House 898 Barnwell Street
  36. University Hill Charles Edward Apartments 2 Gibbes Court
  37. University Hill Coker House 1730 College Street
  38. University Hill Bon Air Apartments 806 Barnwell Street
  39. University Hill Changing of the Neighborhood 1710 Greene Street
  40. University Hill Singley Apartments 1600 Greene Street

1

University Hill

Rutledge College

Image courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia

The very first building constructed for South Carolina College, now known as Rutledge College, opened its doors in 1805 and housed the entire college including a dormitory, lecture hall, chapel and library. In 1855, a fire completely gutted the building severely destroying the original elements of the chapel and the west wing of the building. When the university was desegregated between 1873-1877, this building served the State Normal School for Teachers, a program that trained African Americans to become teachers. The building is currently used for student dormitories and the chapel is available for rentals.

University Hill

Rutledge College

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2

University Hill

Former Site of President's House

Image courtesy of University of South Carolina, South Caroliniana Library

Originally located at the head of the Horseshoe, the first President’s House was built in 1807. From 1807-1922, every one of the college, and later university, presidents resided in this two-and-one-half story, stuccoed masonry building. After 1922, the former President’s House was placed to new uses, containing several different campus administrative offices including the graduate and alumni offices and the registrar’s office. By the 1930s the building was deemed unsafe. With plans underway for the new university library building to be erected directly behind the early twentieth-century residence, the President’s House was demolished in 1939. In 1952, university president Donald S. Russell desired to revive the tradition of having the president live on campus and had the first Professor’s House, which was built in 1810, converted into a single dwelling. Every university president since Russell has lived in this building on the Horseshoe.


Behind the current President’s House stands the last remaining kitchen and slave quarter on the campus. Faculty that lived on the college campus during the Antebellum period were allowed to bring their own enslaved workers. Many additional quarters for these bondsmen once existed on the university grounds, behind the buildings that front the Horseshoe; however, due to new construction these tangible reminders of the school's relationship with slavery were demolished. For additional information on the institution of slavery at USC, see: http://library.sc.edu/digital/slaveryscc/


McKissick Museum
The structure that currently houses McKissick Museum is the only twentieth-century building standing on the Horseshoe. Built in 1940 with funds from the New Deal’s Works Progress Administration, it functioned as McKiissick Library, the university's main library until the construction of Thomas Cooper Library in 1959. In 1984, the Roosevelt-era facility was rededicated as McKissick Museum, which today houses a nationally recognized southern folk life collection.

Image courtesy of Dave Sennema

University Hill

Former Site of President's House

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3

University Hill

Maxcy Monument

A view of the Maxcy Monument with the original President's House, located at the east end of the Horseshoe, in the background. "Artwork of Columbia, S.C., published by Gravure Illustration Company, 1905." Historic Columbia collection, HCF 2008.4.1

In homage to Jonathan Maxcy, the Clariosophic Society, a student organization, commissioned a monument to be built for the first president of South Carolina College in 1827. Designed by Robert Mills, the renowned architect of the Washington Monument, the monument is one of the nation’s earliest examples of the Egyptian Revival style.

University Hill

Maxcy Monument

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4

University Hill

McCutchen House

Image courtesy South Caroliniana Libray, University of South Carolina, Columbia

The McCutchen House was the second faculty residence at South Carolina College. This Charleston-style structure was built in 1813 and later named after Professor George McCutchen, an economics instructor who lived in the house from 1915 until the end of the Second World War. The building now operates under the Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management program as a dining facility.

University Hill

McCutchen House

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5

University Hill

South Caroliniana Library

"Artwork of Columbia, S.C., published by Gravure Illustration Company, 1905." Historic Columbia collection, HCF 2008.4.1

Celebrated as the first separate college library building in the nation, the South Caroliniana Library stands at the northwest corner of the University of South Carolina’s historic Horseshoe. Designed by Robert Mills in 1840, this library is an example of Greek Revival architecture, and houses manuscripts and archival materials that document the state’s rich history. By 1927, the library collection outgrew the size of the structure and J. Carroll Johnson, a noted Columbia architect, designed two fireproof wings to house the increasing addition of library materials. With the construction of the university's new library building in 1940, which now houses McKissick museum and the visitors center, the Caroliniana Library became a special collections library. The building received additional attention in the 1970s, as interior and exterior renovations brought modern conveniences, including air conditioning. In 2015, renovations began to upgrade storage facilities, add a new fire suppression system, and improve exhibition spaces within the ground floor gallery.

University Hill

South Caroliniana Library

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6

University Hill

Longstreet Theatre

"Artwork of Columbia, S.C., published by Gravure Illustration Company, 1905." Historic Columbia collection, HCF 2008.4.1

Architecturally mimicking a Roman temple, this building originally was a gymnasium and a professor’s workshop for South Carolina College. Named after Augustus B. Longstreet, the building was used during the Civil War as a hospital for both Confederate and Union soldiers. A staunch secessionist, Longstreet was president of South Carolina College from 1857 to 1861 and during his tenure, large portions of the university student body enlisted to fight in the Civil War, causing the school to close. Today, the former gymnasium and hospital is an arena for student performances. During the Works Progress Administration under President Franklin Delano Roosevelt the mid-19th century structure received an addition of a natatorium to its south elevation. Decorative tiles featuring swimmers and divers can still be seen near the addition's roofline. 

University Hill

Longstreet Theatre

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7

University Hill

The World War Memorial

The architectural firm of Lafaye and Lafaye designed this Neoclassical memorial, which in 1935, was dedicated to the men and women from South Carolina who served in World War I. The building itself has a mausoleum or tomb-like appearance that attempts to memorialize the lives lost during the war. Additionally, this building underscores the 1920s prevailing notion that there would never be another world war. Interior marble inscriptions from former editors of The State newspaper memorialize those that gave their lives. Over the years the building has housed university offices and state agencies and is currently not open to the public.

University Hill

The World War Memorial

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8

University Hill

Town Theatre

Image courtesy of Richland Library, Russell Maxey Photograph collection

In 1920, the Columbia Stage Society remodeled the previous eight-room two-story home of R. Beverly Sloan, and rehabilitated the building to function as the Town Theatre’s first building. By 1924, the city building inspector advised and recommended to close the theatre because the building was not fit for a public playhouse and did not meet fire codes. That summer the previous house was demolished, a campaign ensued to raise funds for a new building, and by the end of 1924 the current theatre was dedicated.

Image courtesy Richland Library

Plans for the new building were drawn by Arthur W. Hamby and the façade was designed by Harry Dodge Jenkins, an architectural artist from Chicago. When the theatre hosted its first play, a May 5, 1925 article in The State described the architectural details of the building. Some of those details, such as “the wooden frames of the imposing front door and the windows are painted vivid blue” and “two bill board spaces are framed in blue and the lights over them have beaten iron shades in sycamore leaf design,” still are evident. Today, the theatre remains a cultural mainstay of Columbia, and features excellent examples of the Art Deco architectural style with its rounded forms and low relief designs.

University Hill

Town Theatre

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9

University Hill

Gonzales Monument

This monument commemorates the life of Narciso Gener Gonzales, a founder and editor of The State newspaper in Columbia, who was murdered by James H. Tillman on January 15, 1903. Tillman, the Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina and the nephew of South Carolina’s United States Senator “Pitchfork” Benjamin Tillman, shot and killed Gonzales at the corner of Main and Gervais Street. According to reports, Gonzales walked unarmed down the street when Tillman confronted him and opened fire. Gonzales died a few days later in the hospital. The newspaper speculated that the confrontation stemmed from Gonzales’ severe opposition to Tillman’s policies in many of his editorials in The State, as according to a January 16, 1903 edition of The State, Gonzales had previously called Tillman a “criminal candidate” and a “proven liar” during the previous primary election.

Image courtesy Richland Library

University Hill

Gonzales Monument

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10

University Hill

Trinity Episcopal Cathedral

"Artwork of Columbia, S.C., published by Gravure Illustration Company, 1905." Historic Columbia collection, HCF 2008.4.1

Columbia has had an Episcopal church since 1812 when eleven citizens met in the Senate Chamber of the first State House and formed the first congregation.  In 1814, the cornerstone for a wood frame church was laid. The Gothic Revival architecture present today was not designed until the 1850s by Charleston architect Edward Brickell White. In 1976, the Diocese of Upper South Carolina voted and the church was officially recognized as a cathedral.

"Artwork of Columbia, S.C., published by Gravure Illustration Company, 1905." Historic Columbia Collection, HCF 2008.4.1

In anticipation of its 200th anniversary, Trinity Parish embarked on what appeared to be a $2 million dollar capital improvement of Trinity Cathedral and Parish House. When completed in 2010, the resultant work far exceeded initial estimates in extent and cost. However, the end result, made possible through the dedication of skilled South Carolina craftsmen led to a state-of-the-art restoration of this circa-1846 National Register of Historic Places-listed site.

Image courtesy of Trinity Cathedral

University Hill

Trinity Episcopal Cathedral

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11

University Hill

Site of Maxcy Family Home

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1910, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

Maxcy Gregg, a Confederate general in the Civil War, was born here in 1814 in the house of his father, James Gregg. James graduated from South Carolina College, was a lawyer, served in the South Carolina Legislature, and was a colonel in the state militia, before passing away in 1852. Before its demolition, the two-story wood frame house, which later carried the address of 1310 Senate Street, was illustrative of the original residential area that Senate and Pendleton streets once represented. During the 1960s, the University of South Carolina’s growth following World War II led to significant changes to the neighborhood’s pre-war character and many of the two-story residences on Senate Street were demolished in favor of new construction.

University Hill

Site of Maxcy Family Home

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12

University Hill

Claire Towers

Image courtesy of Richland Library, Russell Maxey Photograph Collection

H. R. Burg sponsored construction in 1949 for a twelve story apartment building known as Claire Towers. Designed by the architecture firm of Lyles, Bissett, Carlisle, and Wolff (LBC&W), the modern apartment building utilized modern materials of reinforced concrete and steel, radiant floor heating, and was designed to be entirely fireproof. Built under the supervision of the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), the FHA regulated the price of rentals and prioritized apartments for veterans and members of the armed services.

University Hill

Claire Towers

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13

University Hill

Senate Club

Work began in 1923 on the Wit-Mary apartment building, which would feature the latest technologies and conveniences in a central location near both the State House and university. The building was designed by Columbia architect J. B. Urquhart and built by W. B. Summersett, a general contractor who also worked on Columbia’s City Jail on Lincoln Street in 1912. The owner of the apartment building, J. W. McCormick, a funeral director on Hampton Street, expressly wanted his building to be constructed primarily of Columbia materials. A contract, then, was awarded to the Columbia Clay Company to furnish the brick and tile for the property. The apartment building opened in early 1924 and included twelve apartments – six of those apartments had five-rooms plus a bath and the other six had four-rooms plus a bath. In 2007, the building was restored, modern utilities were added and the new owners changed the apartment building’s name to the Senate Club.

University Hill

Senate Club

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14

University Hill

McCord House

C. Drie, Bird’s Eye View of the City of Columbia, South Carolina, 1872, Courtesy of the Library of Congress

David James McCord, a wealthy planter, intendant (mayor) in 1822 and 1824, state legislator and president of the Bank of South Carolina, used enslaved labor to construct this Greek Revival house in 1849. When South Carolina College became a soldiers’ hospital in 1862, McCord’s residence served as a food preparation center that fed fifty to one hundred men a day during the Civil War. During Union occupation in February 1865, this site was the headquarters for Union General William Tecumseh Sherman’s second-in-command, General Oliver Otis Howard. The house is listed as a Grade I Local Landmark.

University Hill

McCord House

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15

University Hill

Thomas Taylor House

Taylor House, ca. 1910. Historic Columbia collection

Based on plans of a Boston architectural firm of Andrews, Jacques, and Rantoul, this Neo-classical building was constructed between 1907-1908 for Thomas Taylor, Jr. A prosperous businessman, Taylor was the great-grandson of Colonel Thomas Taylor, a plantation owner and leader in the Revolutionary War whose land became a large portion of the city of Columbia. In 1949, the Taylor family donated the property to the Columbia Art Association, which rehabilitated the building for use as the Columbia Museum of Art from 1950-1998. This adaptive use of the building was in line with the changing of the neighborhood, as commercial and governmental buildings were constructed in the neighboring vicinity during this decade. Today the property is owned by the University of South Carolina, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and is protected locally as a Grade I Local Landmark.

Image courtesy of Dave Sennema

University Hill

Thomas Taylor House

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16

University Hill

Site of Former Residence of George L. Baker

George L. Baker, the president of The State Bank and Palmetto Ice Company, lived in a neo-classical house on this site in the early twentieth century. Built in 1901 and one of the largest homes on Senate Street, the five-bedroom and three-bath mansion included a four-car garage and handsomely landscaped yard. After George Baker died in 1924, his wife rented the house to boarders and eventually sold the property in 1934, at which point it became a venue for philanthropic and social gatherings. The structure's last use was as an American Legion Post.

In 1962, the building was sold to the State of South Carolina and was demolished in 1965 for the Rutledge Building, which now houses the South Carolina Department of Education. Designed by Lyles, Bisset, Carlisle, and Wolff (LBC&W), a Columbia based firm, the Rutledge building was half the height intended, due to state budgetary limitations.

University Hill

Site of Former Residence of George L. Baker

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17

University Hill

WIS Television

The image depicts the remains of residences that once stood on Gervais Street, which were demolished for the construction of the WIS building. Image courtesy of South Carolina Broadcasters Association Archives, McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina, Columbia

The Wonderful Iodine State (WIS), which refers to the high concentration of iodine in South Carolina’s soil, constructed this building as their offices and studio in 1949. Though the building demolished residences at 1416 and 1420 Gervais Street, a trend along the major thoroughfare for the next twenty years, the building’s architecture attempted to integrate elements of southern colonial architecture into a modern edifice. During the grand opening of the building, WIS invited local residents and radio celebrities to tour the new studios. While the company eventually outgrew radio and focused on television, the network still operates today for the city of Columbia.

Image courtesy of South Carolina Broadcasters Association Archives, McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina, Columbia

University Hill

WIS Television

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18

University Hill

Horry-Guignard House

C. Drie, Bird’s Eye View of the City of Columbia, South Carolina, 1872, Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Peter Horry, a merchant, planter, and Revolutionary War colonel who fought under General Francis Marion, built this house on land bought from his brother-in-law, James G. Guignard, between 1813 and 1814. Horry also grew a large vegetable garden on the adjacent four-acre block, bounded by Senate, Pickens, Pendleton, and Henderson streets, which fed his family and enslaved workers. Horry’s Guignard nieces inherited the property after his death and later the home belonged to John Gabriel Guignard, the Surveyor General of South Carolina, who plotted the streets of Columbia. This house is one of the oldest remaining homes in Columbia, was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1969, is protected locally as a Grade I Local Landmark, and is currently owned by the University of South Carolina.

University Hill

Horry-Guignard House

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19

University Hill

McMaster School


Erected in 1911 during Columbia’s educational reform movement, McMaster School was named for Colonel F.W. McMaster, an advocate for better public schools and a mayor of Columbia. The school provided a tangible link to the needs of the white students in the surrounding and developing areas. The University of South Carolina purchased the structure in 1960 and changed the name to McMaster College. Since then, the building has held the music and art departments over the years. In 2000, Historic Columbia awarded the University of South Carolina an historic preservation award for New Construction in a Historic Context for the structure’s massive, architecturally sympathetic addition that extended the McMaster School building to the east. Currently, the building is owned by the University of South Carolina and houses the School of Visual Art and Design.

University Hill

McMaster School

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20

University Hill

Cain-Matthews-Tompkins House

Also known as the Black House, this Eclectic style home with Tudor (chimney pots), Craftsman (exposed rafter tails) and Colonial Revival elements (windows and form), was built for John Jefferson Cain, a leading building contractor in Columbia in 1911. The University of South Carolina bought the property in 1974 with the intent to demolish it, but eventually kept the structure after the community spoke out against its impending demise. The Black House now forms the historic core of the inn. In 2006, Historic Columbia awarded the team effort between the university, preservationists, and the university hill neighborhood with two preservation awards for the work on the Inn at USC. The work completed on the Black House earned an Adaptive Use award for retaining the historic character of the residence, including preserving the Honduran mahogany woodwork throughout the home, and successfully adapting it to its new use as the hotel’s lobby.

This 1974 photo depicts the living room with the mahagony untouched. Historic Columbia collection

University Hill

Cain-Matthews-Tompkins House

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21

University Hill

Kirkland Apartments

The Kirkland Apartments are visible on the right side of the photograph.

The Kirkland Apartments, built in 1918 by the prominent Columbia architect George E. Lafaye, are an Italian Renaissance Revival style apartment building that was built to accommodate university professors.  It now serves as a University hotel and houses visitors to the National Advocacy Center across the street. In 2006, Historic Columbia awarded the team effort between the university, preservationists, and the university hill neighborhood with two preservation awards for the work on the Inn at USC. The work completed on the Kirkland Apartments contributed to both the Adaptive Use and New Construction in a Historic Context preservation awards.

This image was taken slightly before the rehabilitation work.

University Hill

Kirkland Apartments

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22

University Hill

Columbia Cottage

Once standing a block west, when the University began construction of the Inn at USC, this house was saved and relocated to avoid demolition. A vernacular form, the Columbia Cottage, as defined by Dr. Harold N. Cooledge, an architectural historian from Clemson University, typically consisted of a wood frame one-and-one-half story structure raised on brick piers with a basement and porch supported by four columns. The Columbia Cottage also typically was symmetrical with central passage plan that had two interior chimneys. Built from the mid-nineteenth century though the first quarter of the twentieth century, with widespread use by 1872, many of these cottages appear throughout the Arsenal Hill, Ward One and Robert Mills historic areas.

University Hill

Columbia Cottage

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23

University Hill

Scott House

Jonathon B. Scott, a mailing clerk for The State, built this Queen Anne style house between 1899-1901. During the 1980s, the house was rented to college students including author Charles Frazier, the author of Cold Mountain, while a student at the University of South Carolina. The home was adapted for use as the Rose Hall Bed and Breakfast Inn in the spring of 1998.

University Hill

Scott House

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24

University Hill

Site of the Last Home of General Wade Hampton III

 Artwork of Columbia, S.C., published by Gravure Illustration Company, 1905. Historic Columbia Collection, HCF 2008.4.1

The current Hampton House apartment complex occupies the site of the last home of Confederate General Wade Hampton III, governor of South Carolina following Reconstruction from 1876-1879, and US Senator from 1879-1891. According to the historical marker, citizens of Columbia gifted Hampton the home in 1899 to show their appreciation and thank him for his service to the state. The original house was built with nine rooms and two bathrooms and was demolished in 1964. Spong Construction Company, built a four-story 32-unit apartment complex on that site for roughly $300,000. The building featured modern conveniences, such as two elevators and air conditioning, and other amenities including parqueted floors, wall-to-wall carpeting and General Electric kitchen appliances.

University Hill

Site of the Last Home of General Wade Hampton III

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25

University Hill

William Sloan House

As early as 1888, William McBurney Sloan, a mayor of Columbia from 1894-1898 and gauger for the dispensaries in Richland County, lived on the corner of Senate and Barnwell streets in an eleven-bedroom 208 x 160 foot building. According to Columbia city directories, Sloan moved to 1006 Henderson Street around 1891, but lived once again on Senate Street in at least 1908. According to a 1919 mention in The State, Sloan was an enthusiastic gardener who grew “fine vegetables.” Sloan put the property up for sale in November of 1922, following the passing of his wife, Cynthia, the year prior. Later owners rented rooms in the eleven-bedroom property beginning in 1928.

University Hill

William Sloan House

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26

University Hill

Weston-Edmunds-Verner House

Designed by noted local architect George E. Lafaye while he worked with the W. B. Smith Whaley and Company, this house was built in 1902 for Francis Weston, an attorney and state legislator. Later, the house was given to Weston’s daughter, Mrs. Blake Edmunds. This house is an excellent example of an early twentieth-century Colonial Revival home that features a second-story central bay window and grouped porch columns. As Americans celebrated the country’s centennial anniversary, romanticized notions of America’s colonial past surfaced, including within contemporary architecture. Architects looked back at elements from both the Georgian and Federal styles of architecture for inspiration to create a style that bridged the past with the present.

University Hill

Weston-Edmunds-Verner House

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27

University Hill

Robert Moorman House

Known for its steep pitched roofs, front facing gable, differing wall textures, asymmetrical, decorative mass-produced ornamentation, and occasional towers or turrets, the Queen Anne style exhibits the excesses of the Victorian Age. As an extremely popular style in the early twentieth century, the circa-1901 house belonged to Columbia attorney and magistrate Robert Moorman. This house remained the Moorman family’s residence until they moved to Laurens Street in 1912.

University Hill

Robert Moorman House

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28

University Hill

An American Foursquare

On the night of January 10, 1912, a fire destroyed the five-room home of J. W. R. Pope. Thanking neighbors and firefighters for their assistance in quelling the flames, Pope rebuilt what remained of the house and enlarged the building. Over the years, small families and couples rented this American Foursquare home, which eventually became a duplex advertised to college students in the 1940s. A traditional American Foursquare house is a two-story building with a low-pitched roof and a central dormer, and features either Colonial Revival or Craftsman style details.

University Hill

An American Foursquare

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29

University Hill

Waring-Crosswell-McMeekin House

The Columbia architectural firm of Shand & Lafaye designed this Colonial Revival style residence for Clarence C. Waring of the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Company. Other notable people who called the ca. 1909 residence home include the Crosswell family, who owned and operated the local Coca-Cola Bottling Company, and Silas C. McMeekin, a president of the South Carolina Electric and Gas Company.

University Hill

Waring-Crosswell-McMeekin House

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30

University Hill

A. S. Salley House

Alexander Samuel Salley, a long term advocate of South Carolina history and former director of the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, lived at this property from 1909 until his death in 1961. During his occupancy, Salley built a separate library building at 1917 Senate Street, which today is used as a separate residence. After Salley’s tenure, Joseph Daniel Sapp, an early advocate for the preservation of the University Hill Neighborhood, lived here.

Here is a view of what once was the library building, which is just west of the main house.

University Hill

A. S. Salley House

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31

University Hill

Charleston Single-House

This modern interpretation that captures the essence and details of its historic coastal antecedents is unique to the University Hill neighborhood. Known for its two-story piazzas that capture the breeze, the "Charleston Single House" became a prevalent architectural form in South Carolina's port city from the mid 18th through early 19th centuries. While popular in the Holy City, examples of the Single House nonetheless are far fewer in Columbia.

University Hill

Charleston Single-House

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32

University Hill

Boyne-Pressley-Spigner House

In 1915, construction began on this Italian Renaissance Revival style residence for Thomas A. Boyne and Isabel Allworden Boyne, whose father had deeded the 27.8-acre tract to her. Designed by J. Carroll Johnson, of the firm Urquhart & Johnson, the building includes unique architectural features, such as the uncovered limestone, brick and tiled terrace that spans the width of the front and wraps onto both side elevations. The Boynes sold the property in 1937 to the director of the Palmetto National Bank, G. Trezevant Pressley and his wife, Annie. In 1963, Henrietta Geddes Bailey Spigner, the wife of Adolphus Fletcher Spigner Jr., a Richland County State Senator from 1955-1956, conveyed the property to the University of South Carolina.

Between 2009-2012, the university hired the Boudreaux Group, a Columbia-based firm, to renovate the interior and rehabilitate the structure into a meeting and conference space. Once the project was completed, the house achieved Gold Level LEED status as the renovation work adhered to sustainable strategies that reduced energy costs. Historic Columbia recognized the efforts of both the University of South Carolina and the Boudreaux Group in 2013 and awarded both parties a Preservation/Restoration award at its annual Preservation Awards.

 
The interior renovation included installation of new electrical, mechanical, plumbing and fire alarm systems. The wood windows received minor repairs and the hardwood floors were restored. An entirely new (but historically appropriate) color palette and lighting scheme brings the interiors to life and emphasizes the wood trim and plaster ceiling features. The upstairs is now used as offices for the University’s food service vendor, Sodexho, which also operates the meeting space downstairs. A highlight is the previously-enclosed porch, which now features new windows. The light-filled space with leaded glass windows looking into the central hall now serves as the catering director’s office.

University Hill

Boyne-Pressley-Spigner House

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33

University Hill

An Architect Designed Home

An advertisement in the January 29, 1913 edition of The State, illustrates the current plan and form of the Gibbes Court property. Image courtesy University of South Carolina, South Caroliniana Library

This Italian Renaissance style residence was the home of Dr. Julius H. Taylor, a prominent doctor in Columbia, and was designed by George E. Lafaye, an architect from New Orleans in 1913. Lafaye designed several of the University Hill houses, including his own, which was located at 1716 College Street.

University Hill

An Architect Designed Home

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34

University Hill

Haltiwanger House

This house is an example of the American Craftsman Bungalow style popular in the early twentieth century. Following the excess of the Victorian era, Craftsman homes reduced the ornamentation and relied upon machine made materials. As the Art & Crafts movement gained popularity, bungalows were marketed in catalogs as kit homes from businesses such as Sears. In 1913, James W. Haltiwanger, owner of a popular women’s clothing store on Main Street, had this home built.

University Hill

Haltiwanger House

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35

University Hill

Capstone House

 

Image courtesy of Dave Sennema

The University began encroaching into the University Hill neighborhood in the 1960s with the construction of the Capstone House, as the university began to purchase property within the Gibbes Court neighborhood. Worried about parking and traffic concerns, as well as the demolition of historic homes, the neighborhood pushed back to resist the university’s eastward expansion. Unfortunately, the university had purchased many of the homes on the corner of Barnwell Street and Gibbes Court, which were eventually demolished for the construction of Capstone House. Completed in 1967 by the architectural firm of Lyles, Bisset, Carlisle, and Wolff (LBC&W), this structure was the first residence for honors students at the University of South Carolina and features a rotating restaurant on the top floor, which makes one revolution per hour and the rotating base, was acquired from an exhibit at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. Capstone now houses one of the university's many dorms.

Image courtesy Dave Sennema

University Hill

Capstone House

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36

University Hill

Charles Edward Apartments

Built in 1913 by Reverend Henry Alexander White, a professor at the Columbia Theological Seminary, the Charles Edward is one of the oldest apartment buildings in Columbia. When completed, the apartment building was equipped with electric lights and telephonic connection in all apartments and units rented for $50 a month. J. Carroll Johnson, an architect of several properties in the neighborhood, lived in unit #1 from 1929-1930. This surviving building represents the era in which apartments came into fashion. Architectural details of note include the flat roof and metal fire escapes, as well as the building’s name across the concrete entablature above the entrance. Refurbished in the 1970s, the building now includes modern amenities and brings distinct character to the University Hill neighborhood.

University Hill

Charles Edward Apartments

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37

University Hill

Coker House

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Columbia, South Carolina, 1919, Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

A University of South Carolina professor of astronomy and mathematics, Edward C. Coker was a resident of 1730 College Street. Built in 1907, the structure is currently called the C.S. Lewis Student Center, which houses St. Theodore’s Anglican Chapel, a ministry at the University of South Carolina. The included close-up image of a Sanborn Fire Insurance map depicts the two-story house in yellow.

Image courtesy Robin Waites

University Hill

Coker House

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University Hill

Bon Air Apartments

Class Photo in front of Bon Air School, c.1920, Image Courtesy of Mrs. William N. Geiger

Before becoming an apartment building, this site housed the Bon Air School, which operated from 1912 to 1931. Founder, Annie Bonham, started an open-air school at her home on Gervais Street in 1897, teaching outside under the trees when the weather was fair and in 1910, she even added an open room to her house that was open on three sides. Two years after, Bonham commissioned a 50 by 35 foot building, which contained three schoolrooms. Plans for the building included surrounding the building with panels of glass that could be slid down to within two feet of the floor leaving three sides of the room entirely open. Bonham whole-heartedly believed in the benefits of fresh air as a 1912 article in The State quoted her claiming that since beginning this teaching method, “the general health of the children has improved perceptibly.” With Annie Bonham's passing in 1921, her niece, Roberta Aldrich, continued the school for ten additional years. In 1935, the Bon Air School building was torn down, the lot went up for sale, and a building permit was issued to E. W. Crouch, who constructed the Bon Air Apartments that same year.

Image courtesy University of South Carolina, South Caroliniana Library

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Bon Air Apartments

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University Hill

Changing of the Neighborhood

Until 1911, African American laborers inhabited the southern side of Green Street. Beginning in 1912, whites slowly displaced them and constructed new buildings along the street. The above image depicts one of these buildings, which was designed by architect J. Carroll Johnson who was then working for the Columbia Builders Company. An identical structure stands at 1012 Laurens Street.

University Hill

Changing of the Neighborhood

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University Hill

Singley Apartments

Built in 1939, this two-story apartment complex was designed by Heyward S. Singley, president of the South Carolina chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Singley designed the apartments for Phoebe Callahan Singley in 1939 to supply more housing for the increasing population in Columbia. It now houses many University of South Carolina students because of its close location to campus.

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Singley Apartments

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